Building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders in Western Australia and the Northern Territory

Research output: Book/ReportOther output

286 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This research explores effective approaches to developing throughcare strategies for Indigenous people leaving prison. It is based on a series of individual interviews and focus groups in communities in Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

The study highlights the importance of understanding offending in Indigenous communities against the background of colonisation, intergenerational trauma and loss, and ongoing deprivation.

There are numerous barriers to an individual returning to their community on release from prison, including fear of payback, family disputes and poor communication with local community leaders prior to their return. On a practical level, problems persist with access to accommodation and employment opportunities.

The report highlights a range of issues associated with the provision of prison services and the operation of the criminal justice system that disadvantage Indigenous people.

The report concludes by noting that, if throughcare is to be effective, Indigenous people need to be empowered to drive reform of prison programs designed to prepare individuals for release into the community. Strategies should involve families and other community members and it is important that services are delivered by and in collaboration with Indigenous people and their communities.

Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAustralian Institute of Criminology
Commissioning bodyCriminology Research Advisory Council
Number of pages90
ISBN (Print)978 1 925304 31 2
Publication statusPublished - 12 Feb 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Building effective throughcare strategies for Indigenous offenders in Western Australia and the Northern Territory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this