Brother nation or lost colony? Examining the Dutch Stamverwantschap movement and its rediscovery of the Dutch-Africans, 1847 to 1900

Andrew Burnett

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis documents the Dutch (kinship) movement between 1847 and 1900. For kinship ideologues the white Dutch-Africans in southern Africa were the bridgehead to a broader Dutch identity- a 'second Netherlands' in the south. Using primary sources in Dutch and Afrikaans this study explores Dutch emigration, the transmission of Dutch culture, and Dutch capital investment in the region, offering new perspectives on Dutch imperialism. When the dream collided with British military and economic power in the Second Anglo-Boer War, the belief that race, language and religion could sustain a broader Dutch identity proved to be an illusion.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Martens, Jeremy, Supervisor
  • Konishi, Shino, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date9 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

Embargo information

  • Embargoed from 23/11/2020 to 02/09/2022. Made publicly available on 02/09/2022.

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