Breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen induces tolerance and protection from allergic asthma

Valerie Verhasselt, Valerie Milcent, Julie Cazareth, Akira Kanda, Sebastien Fleury, David Dombrowicz, Nicolas Glaichenhaus, Valerie Julia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

269 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Allergic asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway obstruction in response to allergen exposure. It results from an inappropriate T helper type 2 response to environmental airborne antigens and affects 300 million individuals(1). Its prevalence has increased markedly in recent decades, most probably as a result of changes in environmental factors(2). Exposure to environmental antigens during infancy is crucial to the development of asthma(3). Epidemiological studies on the relationship between breastfeeding and allergic diseases have reached conflicting results(4-8). Here, we have investigated whether the exposure of lactating mice to an airborne allergen affects asthma development in progeny. We found that airborne antigens were efficiently transferred from the mother to the neonate through milk and that tolerance induction did not require the transfer of immunoglobulins. Breastfeeding-induced tolerance relied on the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta during lactation, was mediated by regulatory CD4(+) T lymphocytes and depended on TGF-beta signaling in T cells. In conclusion, breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen to the neonate resulted in oral tolerance induction leading to antigen-specific protection from allergic airway disease. This study may pave the way for the design of new strategies to prevent the development of allergic diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-175
Number of pages6
JournalNature Medicine
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Verhasselt, V., Milcent, V., Cazareth, J., Kanda, A., Fleury, S., Dombrowicz, D., ... Julia, V. (2008). Breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen induces tolerance and protection from allergic asthma. Nature Medicine, 14(2), 170-175. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1718
Verhasselt, Valerie ; Milcent, Valerie ; Cazareth, Julie ; Kanda, Akira ; Fleury, Sebastien ; Dombrowicz, David ; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas ; Julia, Valerie. / Breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen induces tolerance and protection from allergic asthma. In: Nature Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 170-175.
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Verhasselt, V, Milcent, V, Cazareth, J, Kanda, A, Fleury, S, Dombrowicz, D, Glaichenhaus, N & Julia, V 2008, 'Breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen induces tolerance and protection from allergic asthma' Nature Medicine, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 170-175. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1718

Breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen induces tolerance and protection from allergic asthma. / Verhasselt, Valerie; Milcent, Valerie; Cazareth, Julie; Kanda, Akira; Fleury, Sebastien; Dombrowicz, David; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Julia, Valerie.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 170-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Verhasselt, Valerie

AU - Milcent, Valerie

AU - Cazareth, Julie

AU - Kanda, Akira

AU - Fleury, Sebastien

AU - Dombrowicz, David

AU - Glaichenhaus, Nicolas

AU - Julia, Valerie

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AB - Allergic asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway obstruction in response to allergen exposure. It results from an inappropriate T helper type 2 response to environmental airborne antigens and affects 300 million individuals(1). Its prevalence has increased markedly in recent decades, most probably as a result of changes in environmental factors(2). Exposure to environmental antigens during infancy is crucial to the development of asthma(3). Epidemiological studies on the relationship between breastfeeding and allergic diseases have reached conflicting results(4-8). Here, we have investigated whether the exposure of lactating mice to an airborne allergen affects asthma development in progeny. We found that airborne antigens were efficiently transferred from the mother to the neonate through milk and that tolerance induction did not require the transfer of immunoglobulins. Breastfeeding-induced tolerance relied on the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta during lactation, was mediated by regulatory CD4(+) T lymphocytes and depended on TGF-beta signaling in T cells. In conclusion, breast milk-mediated transfer of an antigen to the neonate resulted in oral tolerance induction leading to antigen-specific protection from allergic airway disease. This study may pave the way for the design of new strategies to prevent the development of allergic diseases.

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KW - ORAL TOLERANCE

KW - MICE

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