Both incidence and severity of white rust disease reflect host resistance in Brassica juncea germplasm from Australia, China and India

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Abstract

White rust (Albugo candida) is a highly destructive disease of oilseed Brassicas such as Brassica juncea and B. rapa, and has caused serious yield losses in Australia, China and India on both species. The first commercial B. juncea varieties are now being deployed in Australia, but their response to Australian strains of A. candida is yet to be defined under Australian field conditions. To identify useful sources of host resistance for Australia, China and India, in B. juncea, three field trials were undertaken in Western Australia. Forty-four B. juncea genotypes, viz. 22 from India, 12 from Australia and 10 from China, were tested. Varying levels of host resistance to Australian strains of A. candida (race 2) were identified among the genotypes from the three countries. Genotypes CBJ-001, CBJ-003 and CBJ-004 from China consistently showed high levels of resistance to A. candida on leaves across the three trials. Overall, the genotypes from China showed the best resistance, followed by the genotypes from Australia, with those from India being the most susceptible. The most susceptible genotypes were RL1359, RH30 and Seetha from India. It is noteworthy that both the incidence and severity of disease reflected varying levels of host resistance in the germplasm from the three countries, irrespective of whether screening was undertaken in the field using natural or artificial inoculation. Differentiation of resistance among these genotypes was similar to that we reported previously for artificially-inoculated seedlings or adult plants under glasshouse conditions, indicating that a choice of options is available to plant breeders to reliably differentiate host resistance among genotypes to white rust in B. juncea. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
JournalField Crop Research
Volume106
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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rust diseases
rust disease
germplasm
Brassica juncea
genotype
Albugo candida
India
incidence
China
plant breeders
Brassica rapa
oilseeds
mature plants
Brassica
disease incidence
Western Australia
disease severity
inoculation
field experimentation
seedling

Cite this

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title = "Both incidence and severity of white rust disease reflect host resistance in Brassica juncea germplasm from Australia, China and India",
abstract = "White rust (Albugo candida) is a highly destructive disease of oilseed Brassicas such as Brassica juncea and B. rapa, and has caused serious yield losses in Australia, China and India on both species. The first commercial B. juncea varieties are now being deployed in Australia, but their response to Australian strains of A. candida is yet to be defined under Australian field conditions. To identify useful sources of host resistance for Australia, China and India, in B. juncea, three field trials were undertaken in Western Australia. Forty-four B. juncea genotypes, viz. 22 from India, 12 from Australia and 10 from China, were tested. Varying levels of host resistance to Australian strains of A. candida (race 2) were identified among the genotypes from the three countries. Genotypes CBJ-001, CBJ-003 and CBJ-004 from China consistently showed high levels of resistance to A. candida on leaves across the three trials. Overall, the genotypes from China showed the best resistance, followed by the genotypes from Australia, with those from India being the most susceptible. The most susceptible genotypes were RL1359, RH30 and Seetha from India. It is noteworthy that both the incidence and severity of disease reflected varying levels of host resistance in the germplasm from the three countries, irrespective of whether screening was undertaken in the field using natural or artificial inoculation. Differentiation of resistance among these genotypes was similar to that we reported previously for artificially-inoculated seedlings or adult plants under glasshouse conditions, indicating that a choice of options is available to plant breeders to reliably differentiate host resistance among genotypes to white rust in B. juncea. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
author = "Caixia Li and Krishnapillai Sivasithamparam and G. Walton and P. Fels and Martin Barbetti",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Both incidence and severity of white rust disease reflect host resistance in Brassica juncea germplasm from Australia, China and India

AU - Li, Caixia

AU - Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai

AU - Walton, G.

AU - Fels, P.

AU - Barbetti, Martin

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - White rust (Albugo candida) is a highly destructive disease of oilseed Brassicas such as Brassica juncea and B. rapa, and has caused serious yield losses in Australia, China and India on both species. The first commercial B. juncea varieties are now being deployed in Australia, but their response to Australian strains of A. candida is yet to be defined under Australian field conditions. To identify useful sources of host resistance for Australia, China and India, in B. juncea, three field trials were undertaken in Western Australia. Forty-four B. juncea genotypes, viz. 22 from India, 12 from Australia and 10 from China, were tested. Varying levels of host resistance to Australian strains of A. candida (race 2) were identified among the genotypes from the three countries. Genotypes CBJ-001, CBJ-003 and CBJ-004 from China consistently showed high levels of resistance to A. candida on leaves across the three trials. Overall, the genotypes from China showed the best resistance, followed by the genotypes from Australia, with those from India being the most susceptible. The most susceptible genotypes were RL1359, RH30 and Seetha from India. It is noteworthy that both the incidence and severity of disease reflected varying levels of host resistance in the germplasm from the three countries, irrespective of whether screening was undertaken in the field using natural or artificial inoculation. Differentiation of resistance among these genotypes was similar to that we reported previously for artificially-inoculated seedlings or adult plants under glasshouse conditions, indicating that a choice of options is available to plant breeders to reliably differentiate host resistance among genotypes to white rust in B. juncea. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - White rust (Albugo candida) is a highly destructive disease of oilseed Brassicas such as Brassica juncea and B. rapa, and has caused serious yield losses in Australia, China and India on both species. The first commercial B. juncea varieties are now being deployed in Australia, but their response to Australian strains of A. candida is yet to be defined under Australian field conditions. To identify useful sources of host resistance for Australia, China and India, in B. juncea, three field trials were undertaken in Western Australia. Forty-four B. juncea genotypes, viz. 22 from India, 12 from Australia and 10 from China, were tested. Varying levels of host resistance to Australian strains of A. candida (race 2) were identified among the genotypes from the three countries. Genotypes CBJ-001, CBJ-003 and CBJ-004 from China consistently showed high levels of resistance to A. candida on leaves across the three trials. Overall, the genotypes from China showed the best resistance, followed by the genotypes from Australia, with those from India being the most susceptible. The most susceptible genotypes were RL1359, RH30 and Seetha from India. It is noteworthy that both the incidence and severity of disease reflected varying levels of host resistance in the germplasm from the three countries, irrespective of whether screening was undertaken in the field using natural or artificial inoculation. Differentiation of resistance among these genotypes was similar to that we reported previously for artificially-inoculated seedlings or adult plants under glasshouse conditions, indicating that a choice of options is available to plant breeders to reliably differentiate host resistance among genotypes to white rust in B. juncea. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1016/j.fcr.2007.10.003

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M3 - Article

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JF - Field Crop Research

SN - 0378-4290

ER -