Best practice for estimating elder abuse prevalence in Australia: moving towards the dynamic concept of ‘adults at risk’ and away from arbitrary age cut-offs

Emily Moir, Barbara Blundell, Joseph Patrick Clare, Michael Walter Clare

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

In June 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission (‘ALRC’) released the Inquiry on Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse. A national elder abuse prevalence study was a key recommendation to: (1) measure the extent of this problem within Australia; (2) help arrange availability and demand for resources, and responses delivered by statutory authorities and organisations; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of services designed to prevent elder abuse (ALRC 2017). In the past, elder abuse prevalence research has relied on age ‘cut-offs’ to determine the older population and what proportion of this population has experienced abuse. This comment questions the validity of using static age ‘cut-offs’ in measuring elder abuse and suggests a move forward to dynamic measures of risk for adults in prevalence studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-190
JournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justice
Volume29
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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title = "Best practice for estimating elder abuse prevalence in Australia: moving towards the dynamic concept of ‘adults at risk’ and away from arbitrary age cut-offs",
abstract = "In June 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission (‘ALRC’) released the Inquiry on Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse. A national elder abuse prevalence study was a key recommendation to: (1) measure the extent of this problem within Australia; (2) help arrange availability and demand for resources, and responses delivered by statutory authorities and organisations; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of services designed to prevent elder abuse (ALRC 2017). In the past, elder abuse prevalence research has relied on age ‘cut-offs’ to determine the older population and what proportion of this population has experienced abuse. This comment questions the validity of using static age ‘cut-offs’ in measuring elder abuse and suggests a move forward to dynamic measures of risk for adults in prevalence studies.",
keywords = "Elder abuse, Older people, AGE, PREVALENCE, Adults at risk, Policy, Australia",
author = "Emily Moir and Barbara Blundell and Clare, {Joseph Patrick} and Clare, {Michael Walter}",
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pages = "181--190",
journal = "Current Issues in Criminal Justic",
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T1 - Best practice for estimating elder abuse prevalence in Australia: moving towards the dynamic concept of ‘adults at risk’ and away from arbitrary age cut-offs

AU - Moir, Emily

AU - Blundell, Barbara

AU - Clare, Joseph Patrick

AU - Clare, Michael Walter

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In June 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission (‘ALRC’) released the Inquiry on Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse. A national elder abuse prevalence study was a key recommendation to: (1) measure the extent of this problem within Australia; (2) help arrange availability and demand for resources, and responses delivered by statutory authorities and organisations; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of services designed to prevent elder abuse (ALRC 2017). In the past, elder abuse prevalence research has relied on age ‘cut-offs’ to determine the older population and what proportion of this population has experienced abuse. This comment questions the validity of using static age ‘cut-offs’ in measuring elder abuse and suggests a move forward to dynamic measures of risk for adults in prevalence studies.

AB - In June 2017, the Australian Law Reform Commission (‘ALRC’) released the Inquiry on Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse. A national elder abuse prevalence study was a key recommendation to: (1) measure the extent of this problem within Australia; (2) help arrange availability and demand for resources, and responses delivered by statutory authorities and organisations; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of services designed to prevent elder abuse (ALRC 2017). In the past, elder abuse prevalence research has relied on age ‘cut-offs’ to determine the older population and what proportion of this population has experienced abuse. This comment questions the validity of using static age ‘cut-offs’ in measuring elder abuse and suggests a move forward to dynamic measures of risk for adults in prevalence studies.

KW - Elder abuse

KW - Older people

KW - AGE

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - Adults at risk

KW - Policy

KW - Australia

M3 - Editorial

VL - 29

SP - 181

EP - 190

JO - Current Issues in Criminal Justic

JF - Current Issues in Criminal Justic

SN - 1034-5329

IS - 2

ER -