Benefits of all work and no play: The relationship between neuroticism and performance as a function of resource allocation

L. D. Smillie, Gillian Yeo, A. Furnham, C. Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors evaluate a model suggesting that the performance of highly neurotic individuals, relative to their stable counterparts, is more strongly influenced by factors relating to the allocation of attentional resources. First, an air traffic control simulation was used to examine the interaction between effort intensity and scores on the Anxiety subscale of Eysenck Personality Profiler Neuroticism in the prediction of task performance. Overall effort intensity enhanced performance for highly anxious individuals more so than for individuals with low anxiety. Second, a longitudinal field study was used to examine the interaction between office busyness and Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism in the prediction of telesales performance. Changes in office busyness were associated with greater performance improvements for highly neurotic individuals compared with less neurotic individuals. These studies suggest that highly neurotic individuals outperform their stable counterparts in a busy work environment or if they are expending a high level of effort.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-155
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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