Benefits of a Novel Hybrid Storage System for Self-Sufficiency of Solar Homes Connected to Stand-Alone Remote Grid Networks: a Case Study of Perth, Western Australia

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Abstract

In Perth, the capital of Western Australia, around one-third of all residential rooftops are installed with photovoltaic systems. The majority of solar power is injected back into the grid due to mismatches between peak electricity solar production and peak electricity demand times. The surplus produced electricity is well above the city’s requirements (especially on hot sunny days) and cannot be exchanged with any surrounding networks due to Perth’s isolation and its stand-alone electricity grid set-up. This causes a production to demand duck curve effect, threatening the future growth of Building Integrated Photovoltaic systems in this part of the world. Improving the self-sufficiency of solar homes using storage systems is one ready-to-use approach to mitigate this issue. By selecting an experimental case study, this paper examines the benefits of a novel hybrid storage system involving a 14 kWh Lithium-Ion battery coupled with a 4 kg Hydrogen storage system first in consecutive use then with optimized hydrogen discharge for a period of one year so as to consider seasonal load variations. Our findings verify the suggested hybrid storage system timely and effectively meets 95% consumption needs for a typical residential building in Perth, Western Australia that can decrease energy bills from $3251.30 to $161.00 and CO_2 emission from 8.6 tonnes to 0.4 tonnes. The parametric design methods described in this study can be employed to attain similar findings for other stand-alone remote grid networks around the globe.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnergy Conversion and Management
Publication statusSubmitted - 2023

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