Behavior and Electrophysiological Response of Gravid and Non-Gravid Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Carrion-Associated Compounds

Guanjie Yan, Shimin Liu, Anthony C Schlink, Gavin R Flematti, Bekka S Brodie, Bjorn Bohman, Johan C Greeff, Philip E Vercoe, Jianhong Hu, Graeme B Martin

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina Wiedmann (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is a major cause of myiasis (flystrike) in Merino sheep in Australia and New Zealand and, as a primary colonizer of fresh carrion, also an important species in forensic investigations. Olfaction is considered the most important cue for insects to rapidly locate carrion over long distances, so the first carrion visitors are predicted to be very sensitive to carrion-related volatile compounds. We studied the responses of the Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, to the carrion-associated compounds dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), butyric acid, 1-octen-3-ol and indole. We also tested 2-mercaptoethanol, a compound commonly used in fly traps in Australia. We investigated whether responses of the flies are affected by their ovarian status by comparing responses of gravid and non-gravid L. cuprina in electroantennography (EAG) and two-choice laboratory bioassays. All four compounds evoked an EAG response, while only DMTS evoked responses in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry electroantennographic detection (GCMS-EAD) analyses and two-choice bioassays. Gravid flies detected lower doses of the test compounds than non-gravid flies. Our results indicate that DMTS is an important semiochemical for L. cuprina to locate carrion resources, and has potential for use in fly traps for flystrike control. Our observations also suggest that the greater sensitivity of gravid L. cuprina allows them to find fresh carrion quickly to maximize reproductive success by avoiding unsuitable degraded carrion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1958-1965
JournalJournal of Economic Entomology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 May 2018

Fingerprint

Lucilia cuprina
carrion
dead animals
Calliphoridae
electroantennography
flystrike
bioassay
bioassays
traps
myiasis
olfaction
semiochemical
octenol
semiochemicals
butyric acid
indoles
Merino
smell
sheep
volatile compounds

Cite this

@article{960eb1abb14f4623942336c124f0a345,
title = "Behavior and Electrophysiological Response of Gravid and Non-Gravid Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Carrion-Associated Compounds",
abstract = "The Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina Wiedmann (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is a major cause of myiasis (flystrike) in Merino sheep in Australia and New Zealand and, as a primary colonizer of fresh carrion, also an important species in forensic investigations. Olfaction is considered the most important cue for insects to rapidly locate carrion over long distances, so the first carrion visitors are predicted to be very sensitive to carrion-related volatile compounds. We studied the responses of the Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, to the carrion-associated compounds dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), butyric acid, 1-octen-3-ol and indole. We also tested 2-mercaptoethanol, a compound commonly used in fly traps in Australia. We investigated whether responses of the flies are affected by their ovarian status by comparing responses of gravid and non-gravid L. cuprina in electroantennography (EAG) and two-choice laboratory bioassays. All four compounds evoked an EAG response, while only DMTS evoked responses in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry electroantennographic detection (GCMS-EAD) analyses and two-choice bioassays. Gravid flies detected lower doses of the test compounds than non-gravid flies. Our results indicate that DMTS is an important semiochemical for L. cuprina to locate carrion resources, and has potential for use in fly traps for flystrike control. Our observations also suggest that the greater sensitivity of gravid L. cuprina allows them to find fresh carrion quickly to maximize reproductive success by avoiding unsuitable degraded carrion.",
author = "Guanjie Yan and Shimin Liu and Schlink, {Anthony C} and Flematti, {Gavin R} and Brodie, {Bekka S} and Bjorn Bohman and Greeff, {Johan C} and Vercoe, {Philip E} and Jianhong Hu and Martin, {Graeme B}",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1093/jee/toy115",
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T1 - Behavior and Electrophysiological Response of Gravid and Non-Gravid Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Carrion-Associated Compounds

AU - Yan, Guanjie

AU - Liu, Shimin

AU - Schlink, Anthony C

AU - Flematti, Gavin R

AU - Brodie, Bekka S

AU - Bohman, Bjorn

AU - Greeff, Johan C

AU - Vercoe, Philip E

AU - Hu, Jianhong

AU - Martin, Graeme B

PY - 2018/5/4

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N2 - The Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina Wiedmann (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is a major cause of myiasis (flystrike) in Merino sheep in Australia and New Zealand and, as a primary colonizer of fresh carrion, also an important species in forensic investigations. Olfaction is considered the most important cue for insects to rapidly locate carrion over long distances, so the first carrion visitors are predicted to be very sensitive to carrion-related volatile compounds. We studied the responses of the Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, to the carrion-associated compounds dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), butyric acid, 1-octen-3-ol and indole. We also tested 2-mercaptoethanol, a compound commonly used in fly traps in Australia. We investigated whether responses of the flies are affected by their ovarian status by comparing responses of gravid and non-gravid L. cuprina in electroantennography (EAG) and two-choice laboratory bioassays. All four compounds evoked an EAG response, while only DMTS evoked responses in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry electroantennographic detection (GCMS-EAD) analyses and two-choice bioassays. Gravid flies detected lower doses of the test compounds than non-gravid flies. Our results indicate that DMTS is an important semiochemical for L. cuprina to locate carrion resources, and has potential for use in fly traps for flystrike control. Our observations also suggest that the greater sensitivity of gravid L. cuprina allows them to find fresh carrion quickly to maximize reproductive success by avoiding unsuitable degraded carrion.

AB - The Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina Wiedmann (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is a major cause of myiasis (flystrike) in Merino sheep in Australia and New Zealand and, as a primary colonizer of fresh carrion, also an important species in forensic investigations. Olfaction is considered the most important cue for insects to rapidly locate carrion over long distances, so the first carrion visitors are predicted to be very sensitive to carrion-related volatile compounds. We studied the responses of the Australian blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, to the carrion-associated compounds dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), butyric acid, 1-octen-3-ol and indole. We also tested 2-mercaptoethanol, a compound commonly used in fly traps in Australia. We investigated whether responses of the flies are affected by their ovarian status by comparing responses of gravid and non-gravid L. cuprina in electroantennography (EAG) and two-choice laboratory bioassays. All four compounds evoked an EAG response, while only DMTS evoked responses in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry electroantennographic detection (GCMS-EAD) analyses and two-choice bioassays. Gravid flies detected lower doses of the test compounds than non-gravid flies. Our results indicate that DMTS is an important semiochemical for L. cuprina to locate carrion resources, and has potential for use in fly traps for flystrike control. Our observations also suggest that the greater sensitivity of gravid L. cuprina allows them to find fresh carrion quickly to maximize reproductive success by avoiding unsuitable degraded carrion.

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DO - 10.1093/jee/toy115

M3 - Article

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EP - 1965

JO - Journal of Economic Entomology

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