Battle Ground: Why the Liberal Party Shirtfronted Tony Abbott

W. Errington, Peter Van Onselen

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Battleground chronicles the paradox of the Abbott prime ministership: the virtues of loyalty when pragmatism was required; strong social values at odds with community attitudes; and honesty when tactics and strategy were essential. All would bring him undone.

Tony Abbott came to the prime ministership lauded as the most effective leader of the opposition since Whitlam. Why then did he fail to succeed in the job to which he had aspired for decades? Frontbenchers leaked about cabinet processes to the media while backbenchers complained about the lack of access to their leader.

Abbott's long apprenticeship in religion, journalism and political life prepared him for neither the mundane business of managing people nor the commanding heights of national leadership. Public?goodwill evaporated after a tough first budget. Inside the Liberal Party individual ambitions and a succession of poor polls fuelled increasing concern that the next election was unwinnable.

Battleground chronicles the paradox of the Abbott prime ministership: steadfast loyalty when pragmatism was required; social values at odds with community attitudes; stubbornness when tactics and strategy were essential. All would bring him undone.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherMelbourne University Press
Number of pages234
ISBN (Print)9780522869712
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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