AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 integrates gibberellin and auxin signaling via interactions between DELLA and AUX/IAA proteins to regulate cambial activity in poplar

Jian Hu, Huili Su, Hui Cao, Hongbin Wei, Xiaokang Fu, Xuemei Jiang, Qin Song, Xinhua He, Changzheng Xu, Keming Luo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cambial development in the stems of perennial woody species is rigorously regulated by phytohormones. Auxin and gibberellin (GA) play crucial roles in stimulating cambial activity in poplar (Populus spp.). In this study, we show that the DELLA protein REPRESSOR of ga1-3 Like 1 (RGL1), AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7), and Aux/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID 9 (IAA9) form a ternary complex that mediates crosstalk between the auxin and GA signaling pathways in poplar stems during cambial development. Biochemical analysis revealed that ARF7 physically interacts with RGL1 and IAA9 through distinct domains. The arf7 loss-of-function mutant showed markedly attenuated responses to auxin and GA, whereas transgenic poplar plants overexpressing ARF7 displayed strongly improved cambial activity. ARF7 directly binds to the promoter region of the cambial stem cell regulator WOX4 to modulate its expression, thus integrating auxin and GA signaling to regulate cambial activity. Furthermore, the direct activation of PIN-FORMED 1 expression by ARF7 in the RGL1-ARF7-IAA9 module increased GA-dependent cambial activity via polar auxin transport. Collectively, these findings reveal that the crosstalk between auxin and GA signaling mediated by the RGL1-ARF7-IAA9 module is crucial for the precise regulation of cambial development in poplar.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2688-2707
Number of pages20
JournalThe Plant Cell
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2022

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