Australian Indigenous Psychology Education Project (AIPEP): guidelines for increasing the recruitment, retention and graduation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander psychology students

Pat Dudgeon, Dawn Darlaston-Jones, Gregory Phillips, Katrina Newnham, Tom Brideson, Jacquelyn Cranney, Sabine W. Hammond, Jillene Harris, Heather Herbert, Judi Homewood, Susan Page

Research output: Book/ReportOther outputpeer-review

Abstract

The Australian Indigenous Psychology Education Project (AIPEP) mission is to: contribute to closing the gap between the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous peoples; and build a more sustainable and equitable society by increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' participation in psychology education and training. Collectively, the AIPEP outcome papers provide a template for meeting the standards set out by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC), workforce competencies specified by the Psychology Board of Australia (PsyBA) and ethical obligations stipulated by Australian Psychological Society (APS), and will contribute to the AIPEP mission.

The objective of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based strategies to increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander psychology students in accredited undergraduate and postgraduate programs. They are divided into five sections: (1) introduction; (2) pedagogical principles; (3) recruitment, retention and graduation guidelines; (4) critical factors for increasing recruitment, retention and graduation; and (5) other considerations.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationPerth, Western Australia
PublisherThe University of Western Australia
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9781760288631
ISBN (Print)9781760288655
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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