Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR) Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP) Annual Report 2016

Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the methicillin-resistant isolates. A total of 2,540 S. aureus bacteraemia episodes were reported, of which 19.7% were methicillin-resistant. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.1% which was significantly higher than the 15.3% mortality associated with methicillin-susceptible SAB. With the exception of the ss-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial-resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was rare. However, in addition to the ss-lactams approximately 45% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 14% resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. When applying the EUCAST breakpoints, teicoplanin resistance was detected in two S. aureus isolates. Resistance was not detected for vancomycin and linezolid. Resistance to non-betalactam antimicrobials was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) is the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Seventy two percent of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal almost 60% of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA), ST5-IV [2B] and ST1-IV [2B]. CA-MRSA in particular the ST45-V-T [5C2&5] clone has acquired multiple antimicrobial-resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Twelve percent of CA-MRSA were ST45-V-T [5C2&5]. As CA-MRSA is well established in the Australian community it is important antimicrobial-resistance patterns in community- and healthcare-associated SAB is monitored as this information will guide therapeutic practices in treating S. aureus sepsis.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberPII S2209-6051(18)00021-0
Number of pages14
JournalCommunicable Diseases Intelligence
Volume42
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{9b07c5304ab94670a9b7252ebfcdd8dc,
title = "Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR) Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP) Annual Report 2016",
abstract = "From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the methicillin-resistant isolates. A total of 2,540 S. aureus bacteraemia episodes were reported, of which 19.7{\%} were methicillin-resistant. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.1{\%} which was significantly higher than the 15.3{\%} mortality associated with methicillin-susceptible SAB. With the exception of the ss-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial-resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was rare. However, in addition to the ss-lactams approximately 45{\%} of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 14{\%} resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. When applying the EUCAST breakpoints, teicoplanin resistance was detected in two S. aureus isolates. Resistance was not detected for vancomycin and linezolid. Resistance to non-betalactam antimicrobials was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) is the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Seventy two percent of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal almost 60{\%} of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA), ST5-IV [2B] and ST1-IV [2B]. CA-MRSA in particular the ST45-V-T [5C2&5] clone has acquired multiple antimicrobial-resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Twelve percent of CA-MRSA were ST45-V-T [5C2&5]. As CA-MRSA is well established in the Australian community it is important antimicrobial-resistance patterns in community- and healthcare-associated SAB is monitored as this information will guide therapeutic practices in treating S. aureus sepsis.",
keywords = "Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR), antimicrobial-resistance surveillance, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), bacteraemia, BLOOD-STREAM INFECTION, MRSA BACTEREMIA, EPIDEMIOLOGY, SURVEILLANCE, MORTALITY, STRAIN",
author = "{Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis} and Geoffrey Coombs and Daley, {Denise A.} and Lee, {Yung Thin} and Stanley Pang and Peter Collignon and Susan Bradbury and Thomas Gottlieb and Graham Robertson and James Branley and Donna Barbaro and Peter Huntington and {van Hal}, Sebastian and Alicia Beukers and Jon Iredell and Andrew Ginn and Rod Givney and Ian Winney and Peter Newton and Melissa Hoddle and Rob Baird and Jann Hennessy and James McLeod and Enzo Binotto and Bronwyn Thomsett and Graeme Nimmo and Narelle George and Sam Maloney and Cheryl Curtis and Robert Horvath and Laura Martin and Naomi Runnegar and Joel Douglas and Jenny Robson and Georgia Peachey and Kelly Papanaoum and Nicholas Wells and Morgyn Warner and Kija Smith and Louise Cooley and David Jones and Pankaja Kalukottege and Kathy Wilcox and Denis Spelman and Rose Bernhard and Paul Johnson and Frances Hurren and Tony Korman and Despina Kotsanas and Andrew Daley and Gena Gonis and Waters, {Mary Jo} and Lisa Brenton and David McGechie and Denise Daley and Ronan Murray and Michael Leung and Jacinta Bowman and Owen Robinson and Geoffrey Coombs and Sudha Pottumarthy-Boddu and Fay Kappler and Shalinie Perera and Ian Meyer",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "17",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
journal = "Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)",
issn = "0725-3141",
publisher = "Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing",

}

Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR) Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP) Annual Report 2016. / Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis.

In: Communicable Diseases Intelligence, Vol. 42, PII S2209-6051(18)00021-0, 17.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR) Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP) Annual Report 2016

AU - Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis

AU - Coombs, Geoffrey

AU - Daley, Denise A.

AU - Lee, Yung Thin

AU - Pang, Stanley

AU - Collignon, Peter

AU - Bradbury, Susan

AU - Gottlieb, Thomas

AU - Robertson, Graham

AU - Branley, James

AU - Barbaro, Donna

AU - Huntington, Peter

AU - van Hal, Sebastian

AU - Beukers, Alicia

AU - Iredell, Jon

AU - Ginn, Andrew

AU - Givney, Rod

AU - Winney, Ian

AU - Newton, Peter

AU - Hoddle, Melissa

AU - Baird, Rob

AU - Hennessy, Jann

AU - McLeod, James

AU - Binotto, Enzo

AU - Thomsett, Bronwyn

AU - Nimmo, Graeme

AU - George, Narelle

AU - Maloney, Sam

AU - Curtis, Cheryl

AU - Horvath, Robert

AU - Martin, Laura

AU - Runnegar, Naomi

AU - Douglas, Joel

AU - Robson, Jenny

AU - Peachey, Georgia

AU - Papanaoum, Kelly

AU - Wells, Nicholas

AU - Warner, Morgyn

AU - Smith, Kija

AU - Cooley, Louise

AU - Jones, David

AU - Kalukottege, Pankaja

AU - Wilcox, Kathy

AU - Spelman, Denis

AU - Bernhard, Rose

AU - Johnson, Paul

AU - Hurren, Frances

AU - Korman, Tony

AU - Kotsanas, Despina

AU - Daley, Andrew

AU - Gonis, Gena

AU - Waters, Mary Jo

AU - Brenton, Lisa

AU - McGechie, David

AU - Daley, Denise

AU - Murray, Ronan

AU - Leung, Michael

AU - Bowman, Jacinta

AU - Robinson, Owen

AU - Coombs, Geoffrey

AU - Pottumarthy-Boddu, Sudha

AU - Kappler, Fay

AU - Perera, Shalinie

AU - Meyer, Ian

PY - 2018/12/17

Y1 - 2018/12/17

N2 - From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the methicillin-resistant isolates. A total of 2,540 S. aureus bacteraemia episodes were reported, of which 19.7% were methicillin-resistant. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.1% which was significantly higher than the 15.3% mortality associated with methicillin-susceptible SAB. With the exception of the ss-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial-resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was rare. However, in addition to the ss-lactams approximately 45% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 14% resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. When applying the EUCAST breakpoints, teicoplanin resistance was detected in two S. aureus isolates. Resistance was not detected for vancomycin and linezolid. Resistance to non-betalactam antimicrobials was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) is the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Seventy two percent of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal almost 60% of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA), ST5-IV [2B] and ST1-IV [2B]. CA-MRSA in particular the ST45-V-T [5C2&5] clone has acquired multiple antimicrobial-resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Twelve percent of CA-MRSA were ST45-V-T [5C2&5]. As CA-MRSA is well established in the Australian community it is important antimicrobial-resistance patterns in community- and healthcare-associated SAB is monitored as this information will guide therapeutic practices in treating S. aureus sepsis.

AB - From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the methicillin-resistant isolates. A total of 2,540 S. aureus bacteraemia episodes were reported, of which 19.7% were methicillin-resistant. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.1% which was significantly higher than the 15.3% mortality associated with methicillin-susceptible SAB. With the exception of the ss-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial-resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was rare. However, in addition to the ss-lactams approximately 45% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 14% resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. When applying the EUCAST breakpoints, teicoplanin resistance was detected in two S. aureus isolates. Resistance was not detected for vancomycin and linezolid. Resistance to non-betalactam antimicrobials was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) is the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Seventy two percent of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal almost 60% of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA), ST5-IV [2B] and ST1-IV [2B]. CA-MRSA in particular the ST45-V-T [5C2&5] clone has acquired multiple antimicrobial-resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Twelve percent of CA-MRSA were ST45-V-T [5C2&5]. As CA-MRSA is well established in the Australian community it is important antimicrobial-resistance patterns in community- and healthcare-associated SAB is monitored as this information will guide therapeutic practices in treating S. aureus sepsis.

KW - Australian Group on Antimicrobial-resistance (AGAR)

KW - antimicrobial-resistance surveillance

KW - Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), bacteraemia

KW - BLOOD-STREAM INFECTION

KW - MRSA BACTEREMIA

KW - EPIDEMIOLOGY

KW - SURVEILLANCE

KW - MORTALITY

KW - STRAIN

M3 - Article

VL - 42

JO - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

JF - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

SN - 0725-3141

M1 - PII S2209-6051(18)00021-0

ER -