Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) Annual Report 2016

Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis

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Abstract

From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP). The aim of AESOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteraemia isolates in Australia that were antimicrobial resistant, and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the E. faecium isolates. Of the 1,058 unique episodes of bacteraemia investigated, 95.2% were caused by either E. faecalis (56.2%) or E. faecium (39.0%) Ampicillin resistance was detected in 0.2% of E. faecalis and in 91.5% of E. faecium. Vancomycin non-susceptibility was reported in 0.3% and 47.7% of E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively. Overall, 49.3% of E. faecium harboured vanA or vanB genes. For the vanA/B positive E. faecium isolates, 55.2% harboured vanB genes and 42.8% vanA genes, 2% harboured vanA and vanB genes. The percentage of E. faecium bacteraemia isolates resistant to vancomycin in Australia is significantly higher than that seen in most European countries. E. faecium consisted of 48 multilocus sequence types (STs) of which 90.2% of isolates were classified into 13 major STs containing 5 or more isolates. All major STs belong to clonal cluster (C) 17, a major hospital-adapted polyclonal E. faecium cluster. Four of the 6 predominant STs (ST17, ST796, ST80 and ST203) were found across most regions of Australia. The most predominant clone ST1421 (previously known as M-type 1) does not have a pstS housekeeping gene and was found in NSW, the ACT and Victoria. This clone was first described in ASSOP 2015. Overall, 74% of isolates belonging to the 6 predominant STs harboured vanA or vanB genes. The AESOP 2016 has shown enterococcal bacteraemias in Australia are frequently caused by polyclonal ampicillin-resistant high-level gentamicin resistant vanA or vanB E. faecium which have limited treatment options.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberPII S2209-6051(18)00020-9
Number of pages10
JournalCommunicable Diseases Intelligence
Volume42
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2018

Cite this

@article{653aed9b64e04eca81ab2af21a62d153,
title = "Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) Annual Report 2016",
abstract = "From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP). The aim of AESOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteraemia isolates in Australia that were antimicrobial resistant, and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the E. faecium isolates. Of the 1,058 unique episodes of bacteraemia investigated, 95.2{\%} were caused by either E. faecalis (56.2{\%}) or E. faecium (39.0{\%}) Ampicillin resistance was detected in 0.2{\%} of E. faecalis and in 91.5{\%} of E. faecium. Vancomycin non-susceptibility was reported in 0.3{\%} and 47.7{\%} of E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively. Overall, 49.3{\%} of E. faecium harboured vanA or vanB genes. For the vanA/B positive E. faecium isolates, 55.2{\%} harboured vanB genes and 42.8{\%} vanA genes, 2{\%} harboured vanA and vanB genes. The percentage of E. faecium bacteraemia isolates resistant to vancomycin in Australia is significantly higher than that seen in most European countries. E. faecium consisted of 48 multilocus sequence types (STs) of which 90.2{\%} of isolates were classified into 13 major STs containing 5 or more isolates. All major STs belong to clonal cluster (C) 17, a major hospital-adapted polyclonal E. faecium cluster. Four of the 6 predominant STs (ST17, ST796, ST80 and ST203) were found across most regions of Australia. The most predominant clone ST1421 (previously known as M-type 1) does not have a pstS housekeeping gene and was found in NSW, the ACT and Victoria. This clone was first described in ASSOP 2015. Overall, 74{\%} of isolates belonging to the 6 predominant STs harboured vanA or vanB genes. The AESOP 2016 has shown enterococcal bacteraemias in Australia are frequently caused by polyclonal ampicillin-resistant high-level gentamicin resistant vanA or vanB E. faecium which have limited treatment options.",
keywords = "Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR), antimicrobial resistance surveillance, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE), Bacteraemia, MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY, VANCOMYCIN, PREVALENCE, FAECIUM",
author = "{Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis} and Coombs, {Geoffrey W.} and Daley, {Denise A.} and Yung Thin and Stanley Pang and Peter Collignon and Susan Bradbury and Thomas Gottlieb and Graham Robertson and James Branley and Donna Barbaro and Peter Huntington and {van Hal}, Sebastian and Alicia Beukers and Jon Iredell and Andrew Ginn and Rod Givney and Ian Winney and Peter Newton and Melissa Hoddle and Rob Baird and Jann Hennessy and James McLeod and Enzo Binotto and Bronwyn Thomsett and Graeme Nimmo and Narelle George and Sam Maloney and Cheryl Curtis and Robert Horvath and Laura Martin and Naomi Runnegar and Joel Douglas and Jenny Robson and Georgia Peachey and Kelly Papanaoum and Nicholas Wells and Morgyn Warner and Kija Smith and Louise Cooley and David Jones and Pankaja Kalukottege and Kathy Wilcox and Denis Spelman and Rose Bernhard and Paul Johnson and Frances Hurren and Tony Korman and Despina Kotsanas and Andrew Daley and Gena Gonis and Waters, {Mary Jo} and Lisa Brenton and David McGechie and Denise Daley and Ronan Murray and Jacinta Bowman and Michael Leung and Jacinta Bowman and Owen Robinson and Coombs, {Geoffrey W.} and Sudha Pottumarthy-Boddu and Fay Kappler and Shalinie Perera and Ian Meyer",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "17",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
journal = "Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)",
issn = "0725-3141",
publisher = "Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing",

}

Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) Annual Report 2016. / Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis.

In: Communicable Diseases Intelligence, Vol. 42, PII S2209-6051(18)00020-9, 17.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) Annual Report 2016

AU - Australian Grp Antimicrobial-Resis

AU - Coombs, Geoffrey W.

AU - Daley, Denise A.

AU - Thin, Yung

AU - Pang, Stanley

AU - Collignon, Peter

AU - Bradbury, Susan

AU - Gottlieb, Thomas

AU - Robertson, Graham

AU - Branley, James

AU - Barbaro, Donna

AU - Huntington, Peter

AU - van Hal, Sebastian

AU - Beukers, Alicia

AU - Iredell, Jon

AU - Ginn, Andrew

AU - Givney, Rod

AU - Winney, Ian

AU - Newton, Peter

AU - Hoddle, Melissa

AU - Baird, Rob

AU - Hennessy, Jann

AU - McLeod, James

AU - Binotto, Enzo

AU - Thomsett, Bronwyn

AU - Nimmo, Graeme

AU - George, Narelle

AU - Maloney, Sam

AU - Curtis, Cheryl

AU - Horvath, Robert

AU - Martin, Laura

AU - Runnegar, Naomi

AU - Douglas, Joel

AU - Robson, Jenny

AU - Peachey, Georgia

AU - Papanaoum, Kelly

AU - Wells, Nicholas

AU - Warner, Morgyn

AU - Smith, Kija

AU - Cooley, Louise

AU - Jones, David

AU - Kalukottege, Pankaja

AU - Wilcox, Kathy

AU - Spelman, Denis

AU - Bernhard, Rose

AU - Johnson, Paul

AU - Hurren, Frances

AU - Korman, Tony

AU - Kotsanas, Despina

AU - Daley, Andrew

AU - Gonis, Gena

AU - Waters, Mary Jo

AU - Brenton, Lisa

AU - McGechie, David

AU - Daley, Denise

AU - Murray, Ronan

AU - Bowman, Jacinta

AU - Leung, Michael

AU - Bowman, Jacinta

AU - Robinson, Owen

AU - Coombs, Geoffrey W.

AU - Pottumarthy-Boddu, Sudha

AU - Kappler, Fay

AU - Perera, Shalinie

AU - Meyer, Ian

PY - 2018/12/17

Y1 - 2018/12/17

N2 - From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP). The aim of AESOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteraemia isolates in Australia that were antimicrobial resistant, and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the E. faecium isolates. Of the 1,058 unique episodes of bacteraemia investigated, 95.2% were caused by either E. faecalis (56.2%) or E. faecium (39.0%) Ampicillin resistance was detected in 0.2% of E. faecalis and in 91.5% of E. faecium. Vancomycin non-susceptibility was reported in 0.3% and 47.7% of E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively. Overall, 49.3% of E. faecium harboured vanA or vanB genes. For the vanA/B positive E. faecium isolates, 55.2% harboured vanB genes and 42.8% vanA genes, 2% harboured vanA and vanB genes. The percentage of E. faecium bacteraemia isolates resistant to vancomycin in Australia is significantly higher than that seen in most European countries. E. faecium consisted of 48 multilocus sequence types (STs) of which 90.2% of isolates were classified into 13 major STs containing 5 or more isolates. All major STs belong to clonal cluster (C) 17, a major hospital-adapted polyclonal E. faecium cluster. Four of the 6 predominant STs (ST17, ST796, ST80 and ST203) were found across most regions of Australia. The most predominant clone ST1421 (previously known as M-type 1) does not have a pstS housekeeping gene and was found in NSW, the ACT and Victoria. This clone was first described in ASSOP 2015. Overall, 74% of isolates belonging to the 6 predominant STs harboured vanA or vanB genes. The AESOP 2016 has shown enterococcal bacteraemias in Australia are frequently caused by polyclonal ampicillin-resistant high-level gentamicin resistant vanA or vanB E. faecium which have limited treatment options.

AB - From 1st January to 31st December 2016, 32 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP). The aim of AESOP 2016 was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteraemia isolates in Australia that were antimicrobial resistant, and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the E. faecium isolates. Of the 1,058 unique episodes of bacteraemia investigated, 95.2% were caused by either E. faecalis (56.2%) or E. faecium (39.0%) Ampicillin resistance was detected in 0.2% of E. faecalis and in 91.5% of E. faecium. Vancomycin non-susceptibility was reported in 0.3% and 47.7% of E. faecalis and E. faecium respectively. Overall, 49.3% of E. faecium harboured vanA or vanB genes. For the vanA/B positive E. faecium isolates, 55.2% harboured vanB genes and 42.8% vanA genes, 2% harboured vanA and vanB genes. The percentage of E. faecium bacteraemia isolates resistant to vancomycin in Australia is significantly higher than that seen in most European countries. E. faecium consisted of 48 multilocus sequence types (STs) of which 90.2% of isolates were classified into 13 major STs containing 5 or more isolates. All major STs belong to clonal cluster (C) 17, a major hospital-adapted polyclonal E. faecium cluster. Four of the 6 predominant STs (ST17, ST796, ST80 and ST203) were found across most regions of Australia. The most predominant clone ST1421 (previously known as M-type 1) does not have a pstS housekeeping gene and was found in NSW, the ACT and Victoria. This clone was first described in ASSOP 2015. Overall, 74% of isolates belonging to the 6 predominant STs harboured vanA or vanB genes. The AESOP 2016 has shown enterococcal bacteraemias in Australia are frequently caused by polyclonal ampicillin-resistant high-level gentamicin resistant vanA or vanB E. faecium which have limited treatment options.

KW - Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR)

KW - antimicrobial resistance surveillance

KW - Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE), Bacteraemia

KW - MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY

KW - VANCOMYCIN

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - FAECIUM

UR - http://search.health.gov.au/s/search.html?query=Australian+Group+on+Antimicrobial+Resistance+%28AGAR%29+Australian+Enterococcal+Sepsis+Outcome+Programme+%28AESOP%29+Annual+Report+2016&collection=health&profile=health&Submit=

M3 - Article

VL - 42

JO - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

JF - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

SN - 0725-3141

M1 - PII S2209-6051(18)00020-9

ER -