Australian and New Zealand consensus guideline for paediatric newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopaenia endorsed by Australian New Zealand Children's Haematology and Oncology Group

Vanessa Verissimo, Tina Carter, Helen Wright, Jeremy Robertson, Michael Osborn, Peter Bradbeer, Vanaja Sabesan, Ben Saxon, Pasquale Barbaro, Gemma Crighton, Janis Chamberlain, Silvia Zheng, Kate Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In children, the majority of cases are self-limiting and thus many paediatric patients can be managed conservatively with minimal complications. This varies considerably compared to adult newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopaenia (NDITP) where, in most cases, thrombocytopaenia persists with higher risk of moderate to severe bleeding complications. In the past decade, local and international guidelines have emerged to support approaches to the investigation and management of NDITP, with a focus primarily on adult immune thrombocytopaenia (ITP). International consensus guidelines on paediatric NDITP have been developed, however gaps remain, and approaches vary between North American, Asia, Europe and the UK. There are no current Australian or New Zealand paediatric ITP guidelines readily available, rather differing guidelines for each state, territory or island. These inconsistencies cause uncertainty for patients, families and physicians managing cases. Subsequently, physicians, including paediatric haematologists and general paediatricians, have come together to provide a consensus approach guideline specific to paediatric NDITP for Australian or New Zealand. Persistent or chronic paediatric ITP remains a complex and separate entity and are not discussed here.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)711-717
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume59
Issue number5
Early online date18 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

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