Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) and related psychotic phenomena in mood disorders: analysis of the 2010 Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP) data

W.L. Toh, D.J. Castle, N. Thomas, Jo Badcock, S.L. Rossell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2016 Elsevier Ireland LtdBackground Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are known to occur in mood disorders, but there has been scant research in the area. This paper aimed to explore the presence of hallucinations, and AVHs in particular, across affective disorders (with non-affective disorders serving as clinical reference groups). Specific attention was given to i) running commentary, ii) voices conversing, and iii) negative voices. A secondary aim was to examine patterns of associated delusional themes. Method Participants were 1550 Australians, aged 18–64 years, assigned to one of four groups on the basis of diagnosis: i) bipolar disorder (BD), ii) depressive psychosis (DP), iii) schizophrenia (SCZ), and iv) schizoaffective disorder (SAD). Relevant data collected from the 2010 Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP) was analysed. Results Current prevalence of hallucinations was such that BD
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)238-245
    JournalPsychiatry Research
    Volume243
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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