Asthma insights and management in india: Lessons learnt from the Asia Pacific - Asthma insights and management (AP-AIM) study

S.S. Salvi, K.K. Apte, R. Dhar, P. Shetty, R.A. Faruqi, Philip Thompson, R. Guleria

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2015, Journal of Association of Physicians of India. All rights reserved Background: Despite a better understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, presence of reliable diagnostic tools, availability of a wide array of effective and affordable inhaled drugs and simplified national and international asthma management guidelines, asthma remains poorly managed in India. Objective: The Asia–Pacific Asthma Insight and Management (AP-AIM) study was aimed at understanding the characteristics of asthma, current management, level of asthma control and its impact on quality of life across Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand. This paper describes the results of asthma management issues in India in detail and provides a unique insight into asthma in India. Methodology: The AP-AIM India study was conducted in eight urban cities in India, viz: Ajmer, Delhi, Kolkata, Rourkela, Chennai, Mangalore, Mumbai and Rajkot from February to July 2011. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in adult asthmatics and parents of asthmatic children between the ages of 12 and 17 years with a confirmed diagnosis or a treatment history of 1 year for asthma. Results: Four hundred asthmatics (M:F::1:1.273), with a mean age of 50 ± 17.8 years, from across India were studied. 91% of the asthmatics in India perceived their asthma to be under control, however, none of the asthmatics had controlled asthma by objective measures. Asthmatics in India believed that their asthma was under control if they have up to 2 emergency doctor visits a year. The quality of life of these patients was significantly affected with 93% school/work absenteeism and a loss of 50% productivity. Seventy-five percent of the asthmatics have never had a lung function test. The common triggers for asthmatics in India were dust (49%) and air pollution (49%), while only 5% reported of pollen as triggers. Eighty-nine percent of Indian asthmatics reported an average use of oral steroids 10.5 times a year. Only 36% and 50% of Indian asthmatics used controller and rescue inhalers with a majority preferring the oral route of asthma medication. Conclusions: This study has clearly highlighted the fact that asthma management in India remains very poor, with a significant proportion of patients experiencing bothersome symptoms and worsened quality of life. There is a need for an urgent review of this situation and initiate active measures at local as well as national levels to improve asthma care in India.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)36-43
    JournalJournal of Association of Physicians of India
    Volume63
    Issue numberSeptember 2015
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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