Associations of television viewing time with adults' well-being and vitality

P.C. Dempsey, B.J. Howard, B.M. Lynch, N. Owen, David Dunstan

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    Abstract

    Objective: Television (TV) viewing, a common leisure-time sedentary behaviour, is associated adversely with cardio-metabolic health, fatigue, depression and mental health. However, associations of TV viewing time with health-related quality of life attributes are less well understood. We examined associations of TV viewing time with physical well-being, mental well-being and vitality in a large population-based sample of Australian adults.
    Method: The study sample comprised 4,483 men and 5,424 women (mean age 51. ±. 14. years) from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study (1999-2000). Multiple linear regressions examined associations of TV viewing time (h/day) with the SF-36v1 physical and mental health component summary scores and the vitality sub-score, adjusting for leisure-time physical activity and waist circumference.
    Results: Each 1-h/day increment in TV viewing time was associated with lower physical (-. 0.56 [95% CI: -. 0.77, -. 0.34]) and mental (-. 0.41 [-. 0.70, -. 0.12]) component summary scores and vitality (-. 0.51 [-. 0.81, -. 0.21]). Associations remained significant after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and waist circumference. There was a gender interaction for the association of TV viewing time with vitality (significant in men only).
    Conclusions: TV viewing time is associated adversely with physical well-being, mental well-being and vitality. Further studies are required to better understand potential causal relationships and variations by gender and leisure-time physical activity. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)69-74
    JournalPreventive Medicine
    Volume69
    Early online date16 Sep 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

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    Dempsey, P. C., Howard, B. J., Lynch, B. M., Owen, N., & Dunstan, D. (2014). Associations of television viewing time with adults' well-being and vitality. Preventive Medicine, 69, 69-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.09.007