Associations between proposed local government liquor store size classifications and alcohol consumption in young adults

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Abstract

The prevalence of warehouse-style liquor stores has prompted alarm from local communities and public health advocates. To increase local government control over liquor stores, one proposed planning response is to distinguish between 'small’ (i.e., ≤ 300 m2) and ‘large’ (i.e., > 300 m2) liquor stores. We mapped the size and location of liquor stores in Perth, Western Australia, and tested associations between liquor store exposure and alcohol consumption (grams ethanol/day) in young adults (n = 990). The count of liquor stores of any size within 1600 m and 1601–5000 m of home were significantly associated with increased alcohol intake, whereas larger stores (i.e., > 300 m2 and > 600 m2) were not associated with alcohol intake. Young adults’ alcohol consumption appears to be impacted by liquor store density and convenience, rather than outlet size. However, the presence of multiple stores close to home increases market competition, driving alcohol prices down, and plausibly results in alcohol prices similar to those at liquor superstores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-173
Number of pages4
JournalHealth and Place
Volume52
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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