Associations between cardiovascular disease and its risk factors with hearing loss—A cross-sectional analysis

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between hearing loss and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Participants were recruited between May 2010 and December 2015 and answered a health and risk factor questionnaire. Physical and biochemical assessments were performed. Setting: A community-based population. Participants: A total of 5107 participants born within the years 1946-1964 enrolled in the Busselton Healthy Ageing Study. Main outcome measures: Hearing was assessed behaviourally through the best ear pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz), low-frequency average (250, 500, 1000 Hz) and high-frequency average (4000, 8000 Hz). Self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were assessed via questionnaire. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed via a patient-completed questionnaire and objective measurements including blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin. Results: Of the participants, 54% were female, with the mean age of 58 years (range 45-69 years). Age, sex and family history of hearing loss were consistently strong determinants of hearing loss outcomes. After adjusting for these, obesity, current smoking, peripheral arterial disease and history of cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with pure-tone, low-frequency and high-frequency hearing loss. In addition, high blood pressure, triglyceride and glycated haemoglobin were significantly associated with low-frequency hearing loss. There was a graded association between hearing loss and Framingham Risk Score for cardiovascular risk (P<0.001). Conclusions: Established cardiovascular disease and individual and combined cardiovascular disease risk factors were found to be associated with hearing loss. Future research should prospectively investigate whether targeting cardiovascular disease can prevent hearing loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-181
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Otolaryngology
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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Hearing Loss
Hearing
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Hyperacusis
High-Frequency Hearing Loss
Tinnitus
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Waist Circumference
Ear
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Smoking
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Lipids
Health

Cite this

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title = "Associations between cardiovascular disease and its risk factors with hearing loss—A cross-sectional analysis",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate the relationship between hearing loss and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Participants were recruited between May 2010 and December 2015 and answered a health and risk factor questionnaire. Physical and biochemical assessments were performed. Setting: A community-based population. Participants: A total of 5107 participants born within the years 1946-1964 enrolled in the Busselton Healthy Ageing Study. Main outcome measures: Hearing was assessed behaviourally through the best ear pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz), low-frequency average (250, 500, 1000 Hz) and high-frequency average (4000, 8000 Hz). Self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were assessed via questionnaire. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed via a patient-completed questionnaire and objective measurements including blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin. Results: Of the participants, 54{\%} were female, with the mean age of 58 years (range 45-69 years). Age, sex and family history of hearing loss were consistently strong determinants of hearing loss outcomes. After adjusting for these, obesity, current smoking, peripheral arterial disease and history of cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with pure-tone, low-frequency and high-frequency hearing loss. In addition, high blood pressure, triglyceride and glycated haemoglobin were significantly associated with low-frequency hearing loss. There was a graded association between hearing loss and Framingham Risk Score for cardiovascular risk (P<0.001). Conclusions: Established cardiovascular disease and individual and combined cardiovascular disease risk factors were found to be associated with hearing loss. Future research should prospectively investigate whether targeting cardiovascular disease can prevent hearing loss.",
author = "Tan, {H. E.} and Lan, {N. S.R.} and Knuiman, {M. W.} and Divitini, {M. L.} and Swanepoel, {D. W.} and M. Hunter and Brennan-Jones, {C. G.} and J. Hung and Eikelboom, {R. H.} and {Santa Maria}, {P. L.}",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1111/coa.12936",
language = "English",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between cardiovascular disease and its risk factors with hearing loss—A cross-sectional analysis

AU - Tan, H. E.

AU - Lan, N. S.R.

AU - Knuiman, M. W.

AU - Divitini, M. L.

AU - Swanepoel, D. W.

AU - Hunter, M.

AU - Brennan-Jones, C. G.

AU - Hung, J.

AU - Eikelboom, R. H.

AU - Santa Maria, P. L.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Objectives: To investigate the relationship between hearing loss and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Participants were recruited between May 2010 and December 2015 and answered a health and risk factor questionnaire. Physical and biochemical assessments were performed. Setting: A community-based population. Participants: A total of 5107 participants born within the years 1946-1964 enrolled in the Busselton Healthy Ageing Study. Main outcome measures: Hearing was assessed behaviourally through the best ear pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz), low-frequency average (250, 500, 1000 Hz) and high-frequency average (4000, 8000 Hz). Self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were assessed via questionnaire. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed via a patient-completed questionnaire and objective measurements including blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin. Results: Of the participants, 54% were female, with the mean age of 58 years (range 45-69 years). Age, sex and family history of hearing loss were consistently strong determinants of hearing loss outcomes. After adjusting for these, obesity, current smoking, peripheral arterial disease and history of cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with pure-tone, low-frequency and high-frequency hearing loss. In addition, high blood pressure, triglyceride and glycated haemoglobin were significantly associated with low-frequency hearing loss. There was a graded association between hearing loss and Framingham Risk Score for cardiovascular risk (P<0.001). Conclusions: Established cardiovascular disease and individual and combined cardiovascular disease risk factors were found to be associated with hearing loss. Future research should prospectively investigate whether targeting cardiovascular disease can prevent hearing loss.

AB - Objectives: To investigate the relationship between hearing loss and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Participants were recruited between May 2010 and December 2015 and answered a health and risk factor questionnaire. Physical and biochemical assessments were performed. Setting: A community-based population. Participants: A total of 5107 participants born within the years 1946-1964 enrolled in the Busselton Healthy Ageing Study. Main outcome measures: Hearing was assessed behaviourally through the best ear pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz), low-frequency average (250, 500, 1000 Hz) and high-frequency average (4000, 8000 Hz). Self-reported hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were assessed via questionnaire. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed via a patient-completed questionnaire and objective measurements including blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin. Results: Of the participants, 54% were female, with the mean age of 58 years (range 45-69 years). Age, sex and family history of hearing loss were consistently strong determinants of hearing loss outcomes. After adjusting for these, obesity, current smoking, peripheral arterial disease and history of cardiovascular disease were significantly associated with pure-tone, low-frequency and high-frequency hearing loss. In addition, high blood pressure, triglyceride and glycated haemoglobin were significantly associated with low-frequency hearing loss. There was a graded association between hearing loss and Framingham Risk Score for cardiovascular risk (P<0.001). Conclusions: Established cardiovascular disease and individual and combined cardiovascular disease risk factors were found to be associated with hearing loss. Future research should prospectively investigate whether targeting cardiovascular disease can prevent hearing loss.

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U2 - 10.1111/coa.12936

DO - 10.1111/coa.12936

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 172

EP - 181

JO - Clinical Otolaryngology

JF - Clinical Otolaryngology

SN - 0307-7772

IS - 1

ER -