Association between food-outlet availability near secondary schools and junk-food purchasing among Australian adolescents

Gina S.A. Trapp, Paula Hooper, Lukar Thornton, Kelly Kennington, Ainslie Sartori, Miriam Hurworth, Wesley Billingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to investigate the association between food-outlet availability near Australian secondary schools and frequency of Australian students’ discretionary food purchases. Methods: Secondary-school students in Perth (Western Australia) reported the frequency of their discretionary food purchases from food outlets near their school (17 schools, n = 2389 students grades 7–12, ages 12–17 y). Food-outlet availability was sourced from local governments, then geocoded. A mixed-effects model was used in analyses. Results: Almost half of students (45%) purchased discretionary foods from food outlets near their secondary school at least weekly. Only the density of top-ranking fast-food chain outlets near secondary schools was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of discretionary food purchases. Conclusions: Availability of major fast-food chains near Australian secondary schools appears to be a key driver of Australian students’ discretionary food purchasing. Restricting these outlets near schools may help reduce adolescents’ discretionary food intake.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111488
JournalNutrition
Volume91-92
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2021

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