Assessment of medical practitioners' knowledge about paediatric oral diagnosis and gaze patterns using eye tracking technology

Sarah Snell, Daniel Bontempo, Gregory Celine, Robert Anthonappa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Most studies regarding the oral health knowledge of medical practitioners are based on surveys. Aim: To assess medical practitioners’ knowledge in diagnosing and managing children oral health issues using eye tracking technology. Design: Forty-one medical practitioners completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire and subsequently viewed 5 clinical images of children's oral cavities to indicate the issues observed and their management. Tobii eye tracking device captured each participant's visual search behaviours and mean length of fixation (LOF) for each area of interest (AOI). Participant self-reported confidence in examining the oral cavity, and qualification level was recorded for data analysis. Results: No correlation between time spent viewing the soft tissues and self-reported confidence examining the oral cavity was observed (P =.25). Self-reported confidence in examining the oral cavity was not associated with a correct diagnosis. LOF on the decayed teeth was significantly associated with a correct diagnosis of ‘caries’ (P <.05), and paediatric training was associated with a correct diagnosis of dental caries (P <.05). Conclusion: Medical practitioners’ diagnosis and management were poorly correlated with their objective visual search behaviours of the intraoral images. Self-reported confidence in examining and managing oral issues was not correlated with a correct diagnosis, with the majority not confident of examining children oral cavity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)810-816
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistry
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

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