Assessing the ability of surface energy variables to scale actual evapotranspiration

Tom Van Niel

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis examined the ability of surface energy variables to scale actual evapotranspiration (E) over time and space for use with optical remote sensing data. It culminated in output from globally available data within widely used intuitive hydrological concepts. E was shown as the critical variable within the surface energy balance, which switches polarity with sensible heat flux depending upon whether water or energy is driving dynamics. This finding leads to exciting new opportunities to explore how E can be used to better understand the water balance, the energy balance and further define its role in determining ecosystem behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Callow, Nik, Supervisor
  • Mcvicar, T.R., Supervisor, External person
  • Moore, Caitlin, Supervisor
  • Beringer, Jason, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date1 Dec 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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