Applying persuasion principles did not increase questionnaire response: A randomised controlled trial of a fridge magnet gift

H. Bailey, L. Robertson, N. Henley, B. Armstrong, J. Attia, Elizabeth Milne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Maximising response is an important issue in epidemiological research. Reciprocation and commitment/consistency are psychological persuasion principles that have been used in many contexts to increase compliance with requests. We attempted to apply both these principles to increase compliance with a survey request by sending a fridge magnet reminder. The aim of this study was to determine whether the magnet improved response.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-10
JournalAustralasian Epidemiologist
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Persuasive Communication
Gift Giving
Magnets
Randomized Controlled Trials
Psychology
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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Applying persuasion principles did not increase questionnaire response: A randomised controlled trial of a fridge magnet gift. / Bailey, H.; Robertson, L.; Henley, N.; Armstrong, B.; Attia, J.; Milne, Elizabeth.

In: Australasian Epidemiologist, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2007, p. 6-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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