Applications of Low Temperature Physics to Gravitational Astronomy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    For twenty years a dedicated community of physicists has been developing resonant mass gravitational wave detectors which exploit the unique advantages of low temperature physics. Several tonne masses are suspended in large scale cryostats. Superconducting transducers monitor vibrations to a sensitivity approximately 10(-19) metres. Suspension systems and materials properties allow the acoustic Q-factor of the antenna to exceed 10(8), corresponding to acoustic ring down times of several days. Massive bars have been cooled to less than 100 mK using dilution refrigerators. Using these methods thermal Nyquist noise is reduced such that the antenna effective temperature is reduced to a few microdegrees. A world-wide array of detectors should now allow any gravitational collapse which gives rise to the birth of a neutron star or black hole to be detected anywhere in our galaxy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)28-38
    JournalPhysica B
    Volume197
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    low temperature physics
    Astronomy
    astronomy
    Physics
    antennas
    Acoustics
    Antennas
    Detectors
    downtime
    Cryostats
    Galaxies
    Gravity waves
    acoustics
    gravitational collapse
    Refrigerators
    detectors
    refrigerators
    cryostats
    gravitational waves
    neutron stars

    Cite this

    @article{687817c149234af4852bbb1f3d8995e8,
    title = "Applications of Low Temperature Physics to Gravitational Astronomy",
    abstract = "For twenty years a dedicated community of physicists has been developing resonant mass gravitational wave detectors which exploit the unique advantages of low temperature physics. Several tonne masses are suspended in large scale cryostats. Superconducting transducers monitor vibrations to a sensitivity approximately 10(-19) metres. Suspension systems and materials properties allow the acoustic Q-factor of the antenna to exceed 10(8), corresponding to acoustic ring down times of several days. Massive bars have been cooled to less than 100 mK using dilution refrigerators. Using these methods thermal Nyquist noise is reduced such that the antenna effective temperature is reduced to a few microdegrees. A world-wide array of detectors should now allow any gravitational collapse which gives rise to the birth of a neutron star or black hole to be detected anywhere in our galaxy.",
    author = "David Blair",
    year = "1994",
    doi = "10.1016/0921-4526(94)90195-3",
    language = "English",
    volume = "197",
    pages = "28--38",
    journal = "Physica B",
    issn = "0921-4526",
    publisher = "Elsevier",

    }

    Applications of Low Temperature Physics to Gravitational Astronomy. / Blair, David.

    In: Physica B, Vol. 197, 1994, p. 28-38.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Applications of Low Temperature Physics to Gravitational Astronomy

    AU - Blair, David

    PY - 1994

    Y1 - 1994

    N2 - For twenty years a dedicated community of physicists has been developing resonant mass gravitational wave detectors which exploit the unique advantages of low temperature physics. Several tonne masses are suspended in large scale cryostats. Superconducting transducers monitor vibrations to a sensitivity approximately 10(-19) metres. Suspension systems and materials properties allow the acoustic Q-factor of the antenna to exceed 10(8), corresponding to acoustic ring down times of several days. Massive bars have been cooled to less than 100 mK using dilution refrigerators. Using these methods thermal Nyquist noise is reduced such that the antenna effective temperature is reduced to a few microdegrees. A world-wide array of detectors should now allow any gravitational collapse which gives rise to the birth of a neutron star or black hole to be detected anywhere in our galaxy.

    AB - For twenty years a dedicated community of physicists has been developing resonant mass gravitational wave detectors which exploit the unique advantages of low temperature physics. Several tonne masses are suspended in large scale cryostats. Superconducting transducers monitor vibrations to a sensitivity approximately 10(-19) metres. Suspension systems and materials properties allow the acoustic Q-factor of the antenna to exceed 10(8), corresponding to acoustic ring down times of several days. Massive bars have been cooled to less than 100 mK using dilution refrigerators. Using these methods thermal Nyquist noise is reduced such that the antenna effective temperature is reduced to a few microdegrees. A world-wide array of detectors should now allow any gravitational collapse which gives rise to the birth of a neutron star or black hole to be detected anywhere in our galaxy.

    U2 - 10.1016/0921-4526(94)90195-3

    DO - 10.1016/0921-4526(94)90195-3

    M3 - Article

    VL - 197

    SP - 28

    EP - 38

    JO - Physica B

    JF - Physica B

    SN - 0921-4526

    ER -