ApoB48-lipoproteins are associated with cardiometabolic risk in adolescents with and without polycystic ovary syndrome

Donna F. Vine, Lawrence J. Beilin, Sally Burrows, Rae Chi Huang, Martha Hickey, Roger Hart, Spencer D. Proctor, Trevor A. Mori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have increased incidence of cardiometabolic risk factors including dyslipidemia. Atherogenic apolipoprotein (apo) B-lipoprotein remnants are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of fasting plasma apoB-lipoprotein remnants, apoB48 and apoB100, and their association with cardiometabolic risk factors and androgen indices in adolescent girls with and without PCOS. Design, setting and participants: Participants (n = 184) aged 17 years were recruited in the Menstruation in Teenagers Study from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. The main outcome measures: Fasting plasma apo-B48 and -B100 lipoprotein remnant concentrations in adolescent girls with and without PCOS. Results: Fasting plasma apoB48-lipoprotein remnants but not apoB100-lipoprotein remnants were elevated in adolescent girls with increased cardiometabolic risk compared with those with lower cardiometabolic risk (13.91 ± 5.06 vs 12.09 ± 4.47 µg/mL, P <.01). ApoB48-lipoprotein remnants were positively correlated with fasting plasma triglycerides (b =.43, P <.0001). The prevalence of increased cardiometabolic risk factors was 2-fold higher in those diagnosed with PCOS (35.3%) than in those without PCOS (16.3%). Conclusion: Adolescents with PCOS have a 2-fold higher incidence of cardiometabolic risk factors than those without PCOS. Fasting apoB48-lipoprotein remnants are elevated in adolescent girls with a high prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbvaa061
JournalJournal of the Endocrine Society
Volume4
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

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