Antimalarial herbicides and herbicidal antimalarials: Exploiting the plant-Plasmodium connection

Maxime Corral

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

Using herbicides to control weeds is being threatened by the emergence and spread of herbicide resistance. In addition to better agricultural practice, to address this issue, novel herbicides and ideally ones with new modes of action are needed. The research described in my thesis shows that drugs or compounds active against malarial parasites also display herbicidal qualities in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The reason for this cross-reactivity is an underappreciated and close evolutionary relationship between plants and malarial parasites. Exploiting this plant-malaria connection could offer good starting points for the design of new and much needed herbicides.
LanguageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Mylne, Joshua, Supervisor
  • Stubbs, Keith, Supervisor
  • Murcha, Monika, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date17 May 2018
DOIs
StateUnpublished - 2018

Fingerprint

antimalarials
Plasmodium
herbicides
parasites
herbicide resistance
cross reaction
malaria
weed control
mechanism of action
Arabidopsis thaliana
drugs

Cite this

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title = "Antimalarial herbicides and herbicidal antimalarials: Exploiting the plant-Plasmodium connection",
abstract = "Using herbicides to control weeds is being threatened by the emergence and spread of herbicide resistance. In addition to better agricultural practice, to address this issue, novel herbicides and ideally ones with new modes of action are needed. The research described in my thesis shows that drugs or compounds active against malarial parasites also display herbicidal qualities in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The reason for this cross-reactivity is an underappreciated and close evolutionary relationship between plants and malarial parasites. Exploiting this plant-malaria connection could offer good starting points for the design of new and much needed herbicides.",
keywords = "Herbicides, Antimalarial compounds, MMV compounds, Plasmodium parasites, Arabidopsis, Herbicide resistance, Mode of action",
author = "Maxime Corral",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.4225/23/5b21f9de09946",
language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

}

Corral, M 2018, 'Antimalarial herbicides and herbicidal antimalarials: Exploiting the plant-Plasmodium connection', Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia. DOI: 10.4225/23/5b21f9de09946

Antimalarial herbicides and herbicidal antimalarials: Exploiting the plant-Plasmodium connection. / Corral, Maxime.

2018.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - Antimalarial herbicides and herbicidal antimalarials: Exploiting the plant-Plasmodium connection

AU - Corral,Maxime

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Using herbicides to control weeds is being threatened by the emergence and spread of herbicide resistance. In addition to better agricultural practice, to address this issue, novel herbicides and ideally ones with new modes of action are needed. The research described in my thesis shows that drugs or compounds active against malarial parasites also display herbicidal qualities in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The reason for this cross-reactivity is an underappreciated and close evolutionary relationship between plants and malarial parasites. Exploiting this plant-malaria connection could offer good starting points for the design of new and much needed herbicides.

AB - Using herbicides to control weeds is being threatened by the emergence and spread of herbicide resistance. In addition to better agricultural practice, to address this issue, novel herbicides and ideally ones with new modes of action are needed. The research described in my thesis shows that drugs or compounds active against malarial parasites also display herbicidal qualities in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The reason for this cross-reactivity is an underappreciated and close evolutionary relationship between plants and malarial parasites. Exploiting this plant-malaria connection could offer good starting points for the design of new and much needed herbicides.

KW - Herbicides

KW - Antimalarial compounds

KW - MMV compounds

KW - Plasmodium parasites

KW - Arabidopsis

KW - Herbicide resistance

KW - Mode of action

U2 - 10.4225/23/5b21f9de09946

DO - 10.4225/23/5b21f9de09946

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -