‘Animals into humans’ Multispecies encounters, relational ontologies, and social identity in Indigenous rock art from northeast Kimberley, Australia, during the Pleistocene

Ana Paula Motta

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

46 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This thesis explores how Indigenous people from Australia’s northeast Kimberley related to animals during the Terminal Pleistocene and the role animals played in the construction of social identity. Three rock art styles – the Irregular Infill Animal Period, Gwion Period, and Elegant Action Figure Period – form the focus of this study. Iconographic, ethological, ethnographical, zooarchaeological, and statistical analyses were conducted to study human-animal associations. This work contributes to both local and global understandings of identity through time, through the application of a multispecies perspective that incorporates rock art, Indigenous knowledge, material culture, and the landscape.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Veth, Pete, Supervisor
  • Porr, Martin, Supervisor
  • McDonald, Jo, Supervisor
  • Ouzman, Sven, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date23 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

Embargo information

  • Embargoed from 04/04/2022 to 05/04/2024. Made publicly available on 05/04/2024.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '‘Animals into humans’ Multispecies encounters, relational ontologies, and social identity in Indigenous rock art from northeast Kimberley, Australia, during the Pleistocene'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this