An investigation of the dynamic angle of gait and radiographic characteristics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in subjects with hallux limitus

Michael Taranto

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

[Truncated abstract] Limitation of sagittal plane dorsiflexion, or hallux limitus (HL), represents the second most commonly encountered pathomechanical disorder affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint, after hallux valgus (HV). The kinematic role of the first metatarsophalangeal joint represents an integral component of the gait cycle. It has often been reported that for adequate leverage and propulsion to occur during normal gait, the hallux must be able to dorsiflex approximately 65° on the head of the first metatarsal. Secondary gait compensation mechanisms have often been observed clinically as a result of HL. The effect of HL on gait can be reflected in transverse plane alteration of the foot in relation to the line of progression during gait, defined as the angle of gait (AOG). The first purpose of this study served to investigate potential differences in dynamic angle of gait AOG in subjects with HL compared to a control group. A validated technique using coloured powdered footprints was used to quantify AOG. Furthermore, it was required to establish whether the relative amount of transverse plane motion observed in the AOG was related to factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the foot. Intrinsic factors such as the amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction was considered, and achieved by measuring the rearfoot to forefoot axis (RFA) angle using a weight bearing composite (COMP) view radiograph. The remaining objectives of the study served to investigate other common aetiological factors associated with HL and their potential influence on AOG in subjects with HL ... Results further indicated that the amount of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion did not appear to influence AOG in the two groups, and that AOG did not reflect the iii amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction in a foot with HL compared to the control group. When comparing foot type, as indicated by CIA, it appeared AOG did not significantly alter between the HL and control groups. Finally, the results indicated AOG did not differ significantly between subjects with unilateral HL. This thesis study indicated that with the current sample population, the wide variability in AOG prevented detection of any subtle differences that may exist in subjects with HL. Results also emphasised the need to incorporate other variables such as symptomology and foot dominance when considering the effects first metatarsophalangeal joint pathology might have on HL, such as AOG.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Publication statusUnpublished - 2004

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Hallux Limitus
Metatarsophalangeal Joint
Gait
Foot
Intrinsic Factor
Control Groups

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title = "An investigation of the dynamic angle of gait and radiographic characteristics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in subjects with hallux limitus",
abstract = "[Truncated abstract] Limitation of sagittal plane dorsiflexion, or hallux limitus (HL), represents the second most commonly encountered pathomechanical disorder affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint, after hallux valgus (HV). The kinematic role of the first metatarsophalangeal joint represents an integral component of the gait cycle. It has often been reported that for adequate leverage and propulsion to occur during normal gait, the hallux must be able to dorsiflex approximately 65° on the head of the first metatarsal. Secondary gait compensation mechanisms have often been observed clinically as a result of HL. The effect of HL on gait can be reflected in transverse plane alteration of the foot in relation to the line of progression during gait, defined as the angle of gait (AOG). The first purpose of this study served to investigate potential differences in dynamic angle of gait AOG in subjects with HL compared to a control group. A validated technique using coloured powdered footprints was used to quantify AOG. Furthermore, it was required to establish whether the relative amount of transverse plane motion observed in the AOG was related to factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the foot. Intrinsic factors such as the amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction was considered, and achieved by measuring the rearfoot to forefoot axis (RFA) angle using a weight bearing composite (COMP) view radiograph. The remaining objectives of the study served to investigate other common aetiological factors associated with HL and their potential influence on AOG in subjects with HL ... Results further indicated that the amount of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion did not appear to influence AOG in the two groups, and that AOG did not reflect the iii amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction in a foot with HL compared to the control group. When comparing foot type, as indicated by CIA, it appeared AOG did not significantly alter between the HL and control groups. Finally, the results indicated AOG did not differ significantly between subjects with unilateral HL. This thesis study indicated that with the current sample population, the wide variability in AOG prevented detection of any subtle differences that may exist in subjects with HL. Results also emphasised the need to incorporate other variables such as symptomology and foot dominance when considering the effects first metatarsophalangeal joint pathology might have on HL, such as AOG.",
keywords = "Metatarsus, Abnormalities, Toes, Gait disorders, Dynamic, First metatarsophalangeal joint, Angle of gait, Hallux limitus",
author = "Michael Taranto",
year = "2004",
language = "English",

}

TY - THES

T1 - An investigation of the dynamic angle of gait and radiographic characteristics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in subjects with hallux limitus

AU - Taranto, Michael

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - [Truncated abstract] Limitation of sagittal plane dorsiflexion, or hallux limitus (HL), represents the second most commonly encountered pathomechanical disorder affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint, after hallux valgus (HV). The kinematic role of the first metatarsophalangeal joint represents an integral component of the gait cycle. It has often been reported that for adequate leverage and propulsion to occur during normal gait, the hallux must be able to dorsiflex approximately 65° on the head of the first metatarsal. Secondary gait compensation mechanisms have often been observed clinically as a result of HL. The effect of HL on gait can be reflected in transverse plane alteration of the foot in relation to the line of progression during gait, defined as the angle of gait (AOG). The first purpose of this study served to investigate potential differences in dynamic angle of gait AOG in subjects with HL compared to a control group. A validated technique using coloured powdered footprints was used to quantify AOG. Furthermore, it was required to establish whether the relative amount of transverse plane motion observed in the AOG was related to factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the foot. Intrinsic factors such as the amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction was considered, and achieved by measuring the rearfoot to forefoot axis (RFA) angle using a weight bearing composite (COMP) view radiograph. The remaining objectives of the study served to investigate other common aetiological factors associated with HL and their potential influence on AOG in subjects with HL ... Results further indicated that the amount of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion did not appear to influence AOG in the two groups, and that AOG did not reflect the iii amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction in a foot with HL compared to the control group. When comparing foot type, as indicated by CIA, it appeared AOG did not significantly alter between the HL and control groups. Finally, the results indicated AOG did not differ significantly between subjects with unilateral HL. This thesis study indicated that with the current sample population, the wide variability in AOG prevented detection of any subtle differences that may exist in subjects with HL. Results also emphasised the need to incorporate other variables such as symptomology and foot dominance when considering the effects first metatarsophalangeal joint pathology might have on HL, such as AOG.

AB - [Truncated abstract] Limitation of sagittal plane dorsiflexion, or hallux limitus (HL), represents the second most commonly encountered pathomechanical disorder affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint, after hallux valgus (HV). The kinematic role of the first metatarsophalangeal joint represents an integral component of the gait cycle. It has often been reported that for adequate leverage and propulsion to occur during normal gait, the hallux must be able to dorsiflex approximately 65° on the head of the first metatarsal. Secondary gait compensation mechanisms have often been observed clinically as a result of HL. The effect of HL on gait can be reflected in transverse plane alteration of the foot in relation to the line of progression during gait, defined as the angle of gait (AOG). The first purpose of this study served to investigate potential differences in dynamic angle of gait AOG in subjects with HL compared to a control group. A validated technique using coloured powdered footprints was used to quantify AOG. Furthermore, it was required to establish whether the relative amount of transverse plane motion observed in the AOG was related to factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the foot. Intrinsic factors such as the amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction was considered, and achieved by measuring the rearfoot to forefoot axis (RFA) angle using a weight bearing composite (COMP) view radiograph. The remaining objectives of the study served to investigate other common aetiological factors associated with HL and their potential influence on AOG in subjects with HL ... Results further indicated that the amount of first metatarsophalangeal joint dorsiflexion did not appear to influence AOG in the two groups, and that AOG did not reflect the iii amount of forefoot to rearfoot abduction in a foot with HL compared to the control group. When comparing foot type, as indicated by CIA, it appeared AOG did not significantly alter between the HL and control groups. Finally, the results indicated AOG did not differ significantly between subjects with unilateral HL. This thesis study indicated that with the current sample population, the wide variability in AOG prevented detection of any subtle differences that may exist in subjects with HL. Results also emphasised the need to incorporate other variables such as symptomology and foot dominance when considering the effects first metatarsophalangeal joint pathology might have on HL, such as AOG.

KW - Metatarsus

KW - Abnormalities

KW - Toes

KW - Gait disorders

KW - Dynamic

KW - First metatarsophalangeal joint

KW - Angle of gait

KW - Hallux limitus

M3 - Master's Thesis

ER -