An investigation of self-reported health-related productivity loss in office workers and associations with individual and work-related factors using an employer's perspective

Michelle Jessica Pereira, Venerina Johnston, Leon Melville Straker, Gisela Sjøgaard, Markus Melloh, Shaun Patrick O'Leary, Tracy Anne Comans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Office workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions. This can be a significant economic burden due to health-related productivity loss. Individual and work-related factors related to office worker health-related productivity were investigated. Methods: A survey including the Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, which estimated productivity loss, also recorded individual and work-related factors with potential associations with health-related productivity. Muscle function and workstation ergonomics were examined through physical assessments. Linear models investigated the relationships between these factors and health-related productivity. Results: Significant factors identified were occupational category (0.001<P<0.050), job satisfaction (P<0.001), psychological wellbeing (P=0.031), and musculoskeletal pain (P=0.023). Health-related productivity loss was greater in office workers working as managers, with lower job satisfaction and psychological wellbeing, and those with musculoskeletal pain. Conclusion: Office worker health-related productivity loss is represented by a combination of both individual and work-related factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e138-e144
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume59
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

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