An Insight into the Relationships between Hepcidin, Anemia, Infections and Inflammatory Cytokines in Pediatric Refugees: A Cross-Sectional Study

S. Cherian, David Forbes, Angus Cook, Frank Sanfilippo, E.H. Kemna, D.W. Swinkels, David Burgner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, is increased in response to inflammation and some infections, but the in vivo role of hepcidin, particularly in children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is unclear. We investigated the relationships between hepcidin, cytokines and iron status in a pediatric population with a high prevalence of both anemia and co-morbid infections.Methodology/Principal Findings: African refugee children,16 years were consecutively recruited at the initial post-resettlement health check with 181 children meeting inclusion criteria. Data on hematological parameters, cytokine levels and co-morbid infections (Helicobacter pylori, helminth and malaria) were obtained and urinary hepcidin assays performed. The primary outcome measure was urinary hepcidin levels in children with and without iron deficiency ( ID) and/or ID anaemia (IDA). The secondary outcome measures included were the relationship between co-morbid infections and (i) ID and IDA, (ii) urinary hepcidin levels and (iii) cytokine levels. IDA was present in 25/181 (13.8%). Children with IDA had significantly lower hepcidin levels (IDA median hepcidin 0.14 nmol/mmol Cr (interquartile range 0.05-0.061) versus non-IDA 2.96 nmol/mmol Cr, (IQR 0.95-6.72), p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)online - approx 5-20pp
JournalPLoS One
Volume3
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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