An examination of the dynamic relationship between self-efficacy and performance across levels of analysis and levels of specificity

Gillian Yeo, A. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research used resource allocation theory to generate predictions regarding dynamic relationships between self-efficacy and task performance from 2 levels of analysis and specificity. Participants were given multiple trials of practice on an air traffic control task. Measures of task-specific self-efficacy and performance were taken at repeated intervals. The authors used multilevel analysis to demonstrate differential and dynamic effects. As predicted, task-specific self-efficacy was negatively associated with task performance at the within-person level. On the other hand, average levels of task-specific self-efficacy were positively related to performance at the between-persons level and mediated the effect of general self-efficacy. The key findings from this research relate to dynamic effects - these results show that self-efficacy effects can change over time, but it depends on the level of analysis and specificity at which self-efficacy is conceptualized. These novel findings emphasize the importance of conceptualizing self-efficacy within a multilevel and multispecificity framework and make a significant contribution to understanding the way this construct relates to task performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1088-1101
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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