An examination of mediational relationships involving selective attention to negative information, attentional control, and anxiety vulnerability

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Experimental evidence indicates that heightened anxiety vulnerability is characterised by selective attention to negative information, and impaired attentional control. Limited work has tested hypotheses concerning the potential functional relationship between these anxiety-linked effects. This research programme tested three alternative models, differing in the putative role of each attentional process in mediating the relationship between the other attentional process and anxiety vulnerability. Novel methodologies were used to separately measure each attentional process, and thereby test the proposed models. Findings supported the hypothesis that the two attentional anomalies represent independent characteristics of anxiety vulnerability. Implications and avenues for future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date18 Nov 2016
Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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