An evaluation of National and State policy and procedures for the prevention of the importation of weeds into Australian rangelands

Helen Spafford, R. Randall

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Australia's rangelands are under pressure from many sources, not the least of which is exotic plants often intentionally introduced as pasture or fodder crops. Before being intentionally introduced into Australia, a plant must pass a weed risk assessment administered by Biosecurity Australia. In addition, there are checks by Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service of shipments and international mail before it is allowed entry into Australia, restricting the unintentional and illegal introduction of plants. However, there are many ways in which plants can bypass these procedures and once inside Australia there is little to prevent these plants moving from state to state. Closing these gaps at the international borders and developing effective policies to deal with interstate movement of plants is essential to reduce the impacts of weeds on biodiversity, pastoral activities and other uses of Australian rangelands. This paper highlights these issues and provides recommendations to correct the problems.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)55-62
    JournalThe Rangeland Journal
    Volume28
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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