'An act of faith’ or a new ‘Brown Empire’? The dismissal of India’s international anti-Racism, 1945–1961

Alexander Davis, Vineet Thakur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

At the inaugural UN session in 1946, an Indian-sponsored resolution was passed with a two-thirds majority against South Africa’s racist treatment of Indians. India continued its activism over racism and apartheid throughout the 1950s, though the issue was increasingly seen as a painful yearly ritual. Still, Indian diplomats persisted in raising the issue every year, despite diminishing results. The British settler-colonies were particularly offended by India’s campaign, as it challenged the discursive justification for their existence. They rejected what they saw as India’s emotional, hypocritical, even imperialist, campaign against racism. By tracing the construction and rejection of anti-racist politics, we examine the dismissal of racism as a ‘legitimate’ international issue.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-39
Number of pages18
JournalCommonwealth & Comparative Politics
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

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