Amplitude Integrated Electroencephalography Compared with Conventional Video EEG for Neonatal Seizure Detection: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study

Abhijeet Rakshasbhuvankar, Shripada Rao, Linda Palumbo, Soumya Ghosh, Lakshmi Nagarajan

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    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This diagnostic accuracy study compared the accuracy of seizure detection by amplitude-integrated electroencephalography with the criterion standard conventional video EEG in term and near-term infants at risk of seizures. Simultaneous recording of amplitude-integrated EEG (2-channel amplitude-integrated EEG with raw trace) and video EEG was done for 24 hours for each infant. Amplitude-integrated EEG was interpreted by a neonatologist; video EEG was interpreted by a neurologist independently. Thirty-five infants were included in the analysis. In the 7 infants with seizures on video EEG, there were 169 seizure episodes on video EEG, of which only 57 were identified by amplitude-integrated EEG. Amplitude-integrated EEG had a sensitivity of 33.7% for individual seizure detection. Amplitude-integrated EEG had an 86% sensitivity for detection of babies with seizures; however, it was nonspecific, in that 50% of infants with seizures detected by amplitude-integrated EEG did not have true seizures by video EEG. In conclusion, our study suggests that amplitude-integrated EEG is a poor screening tool for neonatal seizures.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)815-822
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Child Neurology
    Volume32
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

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    Electroencephalography
    Seizures
    Neonatal Screening

    Cite this

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    abstract = "This diagnostic accuracy study compared the accuracy of seizure detection by amplitude-integrated electroencephalography with the criterion standard conventional video EEG in term and near-term infants at risk of seizures. Simultaneous recording of amplitude-integrated EEG (2-channel amplitude-integrated EEG with raw trace) and video EEG was done for 24 hours for each infant. Amplitude-integrated EEG was interpreted by a neonatologist; video EEG was interpreted by a neurologist independently. Thirty-five infants were included in the analysis. In the 7 infants with seizures on video EEG, there were 169 seizure episodes on video EEG, of which only 57 were identified by amplitude-integrated EEG. Amplitude-integrated EEG had a sensitivity of 33.7{\%} for individual seizure detection. Amplitude-integrated EEG had an 86{\%} sensitivity for detection of babies with seizures; however, it was nonspecific, in that 50{\%} of infants with seizures detected by amplitude-integrated EEG did not have true seizures by video EEG. In conclusion, our study suggests that amplitude-integrated EEG is a poor screening tool for neonatal seizures.",
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    AU - Palumbo, Linda

    AU - Ghosh, Soumya

    AU - Nagarajan, Lakshmi

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