AMITROLE, TRIAZINE, SUBSTITUTED UREA, AND METRIBUZIN RESISTANCE IN A BIOTYPE OF RIGID RYEGRASS (LOLIUM-RIGIDUM)

MWM Burnet, OB Hilderbrand, JAM Holtum, Stephen Powles

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    A biotype of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum G.#3 LOLRI) has become resistant to amitrole and atrazine after 10 yr of exposure to a mixture of these herbicides. Resistance has also been demonstrated to the chloro-s-triazines: simazine, cyanazine, propazine; the methylthio-s-triazines: ametryn, prometryn; the substituted ureas: chlortoluron, isoproturon, metoxuron, diuron, fluometuron, methazole; and the triazinone herbicide metribuzin. The biotype remains susceptible to chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, sulfometuron, sethoxydim, diclofop, fluazifop, glyphosate, carbetamide, and oxyfluorfen. Inhibition of oxygen evolution by atrazine, diuron, and metribuzin was similar in thylakoids isolated from both resistant and susceptible biotypes. Therefore, resistance to the photosystem II inhibitors is not caused by an alteration of the target site of these herbicides. Resistant plants treated with a 3-h pulse of 0.12 mM chlortoluron recover photosynthetic activity more rapidly than susceptible plants. This suggests that the basis for resistance is enhanced metabolism or sequestration of the herbicide within the leaf.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)317-323
    JournalWeed Science
    Volume39
    Publication statusPublished - 1991

    Fingerprint

    amitrole
    Lolium rigidum
    metribuzin
    triazines
    biotypes
    chlorotoluron
    Lolium
    diuron
    herbicides
    urea
    atrazine
    triazinone herbicides
    methazole
    metoxuron
    carbetamide
    propazine
    fluometuron
    ametryn
    cyanazine
    sulfometuron

    Cite this

    @article{42c415c7b8164eeca0f2fe5ea152bf2c,
    title = "AMITROLE, TRIAZINE, SUBSTITUTED UREA, AND METRIBUZIN RESISTANCE IN A BIOTYPE OF RIGID RYEGRASS (LOLIUM-RIGIDUM)",
    abstract = "A biotype of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum G.#3 LOLRI) has become resistant to amitrole and atrazine after 10 yr of exposure to a mixture of these herbicides. Resistance has also been demonstrated to the chloro-s-triazines: simazine, cyanazine, propazine; the methylthio-s-triazines: ametryn, prometryn; the substituted ureas: chlortoluron, isoproturon, metoxuron, diuron, fluometuron, methazole; and the triazinone herbicide metribuzin. The biotype remains susceptible to chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, sulfometuron, sethoxydim, diclofop, fluazifop, glyphosate, carbetamide, and oxyfluorfen. Inhibition of oxygen evolution by atrazine, diuron, and metribuzin was similar in thylakoids isolated from both resistant and susceptible biotypes. Therefore, resistance to the photosystem II inhibitors is not caused by an alteration of the target site of these herbicides. Resistant plants treated with a 3-h pulse of 0.12 mM chlortoluron recover photosynthetic activity more rapidly than susceptible plants. This suggests that the basis for resistance is enhanced metabolism or sequestration of the herbicide within the leaf.",
    author = "MWM Burnet and OB Hilderbrand and JAM Holtum and Stephen Powles",
    year = "1991",
    language = "English",
    volume = "39",
    pages = "317--323",
    journal = "Weed Science",
    issn = "0043-1745",
    publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

    }

    AMITROLE, TRIAZINE, SUBSTITUTED UREA, AND METRIBUZIN RESISTANCE IN A BIOTYPE OF RIGID RYEGRASS (LOLIUM-RIGIDUM). / Burnet, MWM; Hilderbrand, OB; Holtum, JAM; Powles, Stephen.

    In: Weed Science, Vol. 39, 1991, p. 317-323.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - AMITROLE, TRIAZINE, SUBSTITUTED UREA, AND METRIBUZIN RESISTANCE IN A BIOTYPE OF RIGID RYEGRASS (LOLIUM-RIGIDUM)

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    AU - Hilderbrand, OB

    AU - Holtum, JAM

    AU - Powles, Stephen

    PY - 1991

    Y1 - 1991

    N2 - A biotype of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum G.#3 LOLRI) has become resistant to amitrole and atrazine after 10 yr of exposure to a mixture of these herbicides. Resistance has also been demonstrated to the chloro-s-triazines: simazine, cyanazine, propazine; the methylthio-s-triazines: ametryn, prometryn; the substituted ureas: chlortoluron, isoproturon, metoxuron, diuron, fluometuron, methazole; and the triazinone herbicide metribuzin. The biotype remains susceptible to chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, sulfometuron, sethoxydim, diclofop, fluazifop, glyphosate, carbetamide, and oxyfluorfen. Inhibition of oxygen evolution by atrazine, diuron, and metribuzin was similar in thylakoids isolated from both resistant and susceptible biotypes. Therefore, resistance to the photosystem II inhibitors is not caused by an alteration of the target site of these herbicides. Resistant plants treated with a 3-h pulse of 0.12 mM chlortoluron recover photosynthetic activity more rapidly than susceptible plants. This suggests that the basis for resistance is enhanced metabolism or sequestration of the herbicide within the leaf.

    AB - A biotype of rigid ryegrass (Lolium rigidum G.#3 LOLRI) has become resistant to amitrole and atrazine after 10 yr of exposure to a mixture of these herbicides. Resistance has also been demonstrated to the chloro-s-triazines: simazine, cyanazine, propazine; the methylthio-s-triazines: ametryn, prometryn; the substituted ureas: chlortoluron, isoproturon, metoxuron, diuron, fluometuron, methazole; and the triazinone herbicide metribuzin. The biotype remains susceptible to chlorsulfuron, metsulfuron, sulfometuron, sethoxydim, diclofop, fluazifop, glyphosate, carbetamide, and oxyfluorfen. Inhibition of oxygen evolution by atrazine, diuron, and metribuzin was similar in thylakoids isolated from both resistant and susceptible biotypes. Therefore, resistance to the photosystem II inhibitors is not caused by an alteration of the target site of these herbicides. Resistant plants treated with a 3-h pulse of 0.12 mM chlortoluron recover photosynthetic activity more rapidly than susceptible plants. This suggests that the basis for resistance is enhanced metabolism or sequestration of the herbicide within the leaf.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 39

    SP - 317

    EP - 323

    JO - Weed Science

    JF - Weed Science

    SN - 0043-1745

    ER -