Amino acid composition of xylem and phloem sap varies in canola genotypes differing in nitrogen- and sulfur-use efficiency

T. Balint, Zed Rengel

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is little information on amino acid composition of xylem and phloem sap in canola genotypes differing in use efficiency of nitrogen (N) and/or sulfur (S). Four canola genotypes with either high or low N-and/or S-use efficiency indices were grown in a glasshouse using deficient or adequate N and/or S supply. Xylem sap was obtained by vacuum extraction 46 days after sowing. Phloem sap was collected via bleeding from the petioles of the maturing siliques 120 days after sowing.Among the genotypes, Wesway (N-use efficient) had the highest concentrations of total N, glutamine (235 mmol/L), and asparagine (14 mmol/L) in the xylem sap in the vegetative stage. In contrast, genotype Westar (classified previously as N-use inefficient) had the highest concentrations of most amino acids in the phloem sap among genotypes grown at deficient N supply.Compared with the other tested genotypes, Surpass 402 CL (S-use efficient) had a higher concentration of S, and Karoo (S-use inefficient) had higher concentrations of glutamate and methionine, in the xylem sap in the vegetative stage. Similarly, Karoo had a higher concentration of methionine under adequate S supply and of glutamate under deficient S in the phloem sap at maturity.In conclusion, in canola phloem sap, the most important amino acid for N transport is glutamine, and for S transport methionine and the glutathione-precursor glutamate. It does not appear there is a relationship between differential N- or S-use efficiency of canola genotypes and the concentration of N- or S-transporting amino acids in the phloem sap.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)198-207
    JournalCrop & Pasture Science
    Volume62
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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