Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

C. Sivirihauma, G. Blomme, W. Ocimati, L. Vutseme, I. Sikyolo, K. Valimuzigha, E. De Langhe, David W. Turner

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study assessed the effect of altitude on growth and yield of five commonly grown plantain (Musa, AAB) cultivars at four sites, Mavivi (1,066 m a.s.l.), Maboya (1,412 m a.s.l.), Butembo (1,815 m a.s.l.) and Ndihira (2,172 m a.s.l.) in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo. The cultivars included three French plantains (Nguma, Vuhindi and Vuhembe) and two False Horn types (Kotina and Musilongo). Fifteen vigorous sword suckers of each cultivar were planted in three replicates of five plants, at each site. Growth and yield parameters were assessed for the plant crop and three subsequent ratoon cycles. High altitude and corresponding lower temperatures significantly increased suckering and crop cycle duration, whereas it reduced the number of functional leaves and yield. For example, all cultivars produced more suckers at 2,172 m a.s.l. (9-11 suckers) and 1,815 m a.s.l. (5- 7), compared with 3-4 at 1,412 m a.s.l. and only two suckers at 1,066 m a.s.l. In contrast, all cultivars had a low bunch yield (2-3 kg) at 2,172 m a.s.l. compared with 19-25 kg at 1,815 m a.s.l., 19-23 kg at 1,412 m a.s.l. and 23-33 kg at 1,066 m a.s.l. Most bunches across the cultivars at 2,172 m a.s.l. were only partially developed, and unfit for consumption or the market. "Choke throat" symptoms were also observed and were associated with the year round low minimum temperatures (10.4-12.3°C) at this altitude. Plantains adapted to high altitude need to be sought and evaluated at the high altitude sites in North Kivu (1,815 and 2,172 m a.s.l.). The high altitude sites (e.g., at 2,172 m a.s.l.) that are also free of banana pests could however be beneficial for establishment of mother gardens for clean planting material multiplication because sucker development is enhanced at these elevations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationActa Horticulturae
    EditorsC Picq, I Van den Bergh, M Smith
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
    Pages139-147
    Number of pages9
    Volume1114
    ISBN (Print)9789462611085
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventIX International Symposium on Banana: ISHS-ProMusa Symposium on Unravelling the Banana's Genomic Potential - Australia, Brisbane, Australia
    Duration: 17 Aug 201422 Aug 2014

    Conference

    ConferenceIX International Symposium on Banana: ISHS-ProMusa Symposium on Unravelling the Banana's Genomic Potential
    CountryAustralia
    CityBrisbane
    Period17/08/1422/08/14

    Fingerprint

    Democratic Republic of the Congo
    adventitious shoots
    cultivars
    suckering
    plantains (fruit)
    throat
    Musa
    crops
    bananas
    signs and symptoms (plants)
    gardens
    temperature
    planting
    pests
    markets
    shoots
    duration
    leaves

    Cite this

    Sivirihauma, C., Blomme, G., Ocimati, W., Vutseme, L., Sikyolo, I., Valimuzigha, K., ... Turner, D. W. (2016). Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. In C. Picq, I. Van den Bergh, & M. Smith (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 1114, pp. 139-147). Australia: International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1114.20
    Sivirihauma, C. ; Blomme, G. ; Ocimati, W. ; Vutseme, L. ; Sikyolo, I. ; Valimuzigha, K. ; De Langhe, E. ; Turner, David W. / Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Acta Horticulturae. editor / C Picq ; I Van den Bergh ; M Smith. Vol. 1114 Australia : International Society for Horticultural Science, 2016. pp. 139-147
    @inproceedings{91e5a8d11a364dbf815785dd99e3a8ec,
    title = "Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo",
    abstract = "This study assessed the effect of altitude on growth and yield of five commonly grown plantain (Musa, AAB) cultivars at four sites, Mavivi (1,066 m a.s.l.), Maboya (1,412 m a.s.l.), Butembo (1,815 m a.s.l.) and Ndihira (2,172 m a.s.l.) in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo. The cultivars included three French plantains (Nguma, Vuhindi and Vuhembe) and two False Horn types (Kotina and Musilongo). Fifteen vigorous sword suckers of each cultivar were planted in three replicates of five plants, at each site. Growth and yield parameters were assessed for the plant crop and three subsequent ratoon cycles. High altitude and corresponding lower temperatures significantly increased suckering and crop cycle duration, whereas it reduced the number of functional leaves and yield. For example, all cultivars produced more suckers at 2,172 m a.s.l. (9-11 suckers) and 1,815 m a.s.l. (5- 7), compared with 3-4 at 1,412 m a.s.l. and only two suckers at 1,066 m a.s.l. In contrast, all cultivars had a low bunch yield (2-3 kg) at 2,172 m a.s.l. compared with 19-25 kg at 1,815 m a.s.l., 19-23 kg at 1,412 m a.s.l. and 23-33 kg at 1,066 m a.s.l. Most bunches across the cultivars at 2,172 m a.s.l. were only partially developed, and unfit for consumption or the market. {"}Choke throat{"} symptoms were also observed and were associated with the year round low minimum temperatures (10.4-12.3°C) at this altitude. Plantains adapted to high altitude need to be sought and evaluated at the high altitude sites in North Kivu (1,815 and 2,172 m a.s.l.). The high altitude sites (e.g., at 2,172 m a.s.l.) that are also free of banana pests could however be beneficial for establishment of mother gardens for clean planting material multiplication because sucker development is enhanced at these elevations.",
    author = "C. Sivirihauma and G. Blomme and W. Ocimati and L. Vutseme and I. Sikyolo and K. Valimuzigha and {De Langhe}, E. and Turner, {David W.}",
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    Sivirihauma, C, Blomme, G, Ocimati, W, Vutseme, L, Sikyolo, I, Valimuzigha, K, De Langhe, E & Turner, DW 2016, Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. in C Picq, I Van den Bergh & M Smith (eds), Acta Horticulturae. vol. 1114, International Society for Horticultural Science, Australia, pp. 139-147, IX International Symposium on Banana: ISHS-ProMusa Symposium on Unravelling the Banana's Genomic Potential, Brisbane, Australia, 17/08/14. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1114.20

    Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. / Sivirihauma, C.; Blomme, G.; Ocimati, W.; Vutseme, L.; Sikyolo, I.; Valimuzigha, K.; De Langhe, E.; Turner, David W.

    Acta Horticulturae. ed. / C Picq; I Van den Bergh; M Smith. Vol. 1114 Australia : International Society for Horticultural Science, 2016. p. 139-147.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    AU - Sivirihauma, C.

    AU - Blomme, G.

    AU - Ocimati, W.

    AU - Vutseme, L.

    AU - Sikyolo, I.

    AU - Valimuzigha, K.

    AU - De Langhe, E.

    AU - Turner, David W.

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - This study assessed the effect of altitude on growth and yield of five commonly grown plantain (Musa, AAB) cultivars at four sites, Mavivi (1,066 m a.s.l.), Maboya (1,412 m a.s.l.), Butembo (1,815 m a.s.l.) and Ndihira (2,172 m a.s.l.) in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo. The cultivars included three French plantains (Nguma, Vuhindi and Vuhembe) and two False Horn types (Kotina and Musilongo). Fifteen vigorous sword suckers of each cultivar were planted in three replicates of five plants, at each site. Growth and yield parameters were assessed for the plant crop and three subsequent ratoon cycles. High altitude and corresponding lower temperatures significantly increased suckering and crop cycle duration, whereas it reduced the number of functional leaves and yield. For example, all cultivars produced more suckers at 2,172 m a.s.l. (9-11 suckers) and 1,815 m a.s.l. (5- 7), compared with 3-4 at 1,412 m a.s.l. and only two suckers at 1,066 m a.s.l. In contrast, all cultivars had a low bunch yield (2-3 kg) at 2,172 m a.s.l. compared with 19-25 kg at 1,815 m a.s.l., 19-23 kg at 1,412 m a.s.l. and 23-33 kg at 1,066 m a.s.l. Most bunches across the cultivars at 2,172 m a.s.l. were only partially developed, and unfit for consumption or the market. "Choke throat" symptoms were also observed and were associated with the year round low minimum temperatures (10.4-12.3°C) at this altitude. Plantains adapted to high altitude need to be sought and evaluated at the high altitude sites in North Kivu (1,815 and 2,172 m a.s.l.). The high altitude sites (e.g., at 2,172 m a.s.l.) that are also free of banana pests could however be beneficial for establishment of mother gardens for clean planting material multiplication because sucker development is enhanced at these elevations.

    AB - This study assessed the effect of altitude on growth and yield of five commonly grown plantain (Musa, AAB) cultivars at four sites, Mavivi (1,066 m a.s.l.), Maboya (1,412 m a.s.l.), Butembo (1,815 m a.s.l.) and Ndihira (2,172 m a.s.l.) in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo. The cultivars included three French plantains (Nguma, Vuhindi and Vuhembe) and two False Horn types (Kotina and Musilongo). Fifteen vigorous sword suckers of each cultivar were planted in three replicates of five plants, at each site. Growth and yield parameters were assessed for the plant crop and three subsequent ratoon cycles. High altitude and corresponding lower temperatures significantly increased suckering and crop cycle duration, whereas it reduced the number of functional leaves and yield. For example, all cultivars produced more suckers at 2,172 m a.s.l. (9-11 suckers) and 1,815 m a.s.l. (5- 7), compared with 3-4 at 1,412 m a.s.l. and only two suckers at 1,066 m a.s.l. In contrast, all cultivars had a low bunch yield (2-3 kg) at 2,172 m a.s.l. compared with 19-25 kg at 1,815 m a.s.l., 19-23 kg at 1,412 m a.s.l. and 23-33 kg at 1,066 m a.s.l. Most bunches across the cultivars at 2,172 m a.s.l. were only partially developed, and unfit for consumption or the market. "Choke throat" symptoms were also observed and were associated with the year round low minimum temperatures (10.4-12.3°C) at this altitude. Plantains adapted to high altitude need to be sought and evaluated at the high altitude sites in North Kivu (1,815 and 2,172 m a.s.l.). The high altitude sites (e.g., at 2,172 m a.s.l.) that are also free of banana pests could however be beneficial for establishment of mother gardens for clean planting material multiplication because sucker development is enhanced at these elevations.

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    U2 - 10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1114.20

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    M3 - Conference paper

    SN - 9789462611085

    VL - 1114

    SP - 139

    EP - 147

    BT - Acta Horticulturae

    A2 - Picq, C

    A2 - Van den Bergh, I

    A2 - Smith, M

    PB - International Society for Horticultural Science

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    Sivirihauma C, Blomme G, Ocimati W, Vutseme L, Sikyolo I, Valimuzigha K et al. Altitude effect on plantain growth and yield during four production cycles in North Kivu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. In Picq C, Van den Bergh I, Smith M, editors, Acta Horticulturae. Vol. 1114. Australia: International Society for Horticultural Science. 2016. p. 139-147 https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1114.20