Altered expression and in vivo lung function of protease-activated receptors during influenza A virus infection in mice

R.S. Lan, Geoffrey Stewart, Roy Goldie, Peter Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely distributed in human airways, and recent evidence indicates a role for PARs in the pathophysiology of inflammatory airway disease. To further investigate the role of PARs in airway disease, we determined the expression and function of PARs in a murine model of respiratory tract viral infection. PAR-1, PAR-2, PAR-3, and PAR-4 mRNA and protein were expressed in murine airways, and confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of PAR-2 and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 immunostaining in basal tracheal epithelial cells. Elevated levels of PAR immunostaining, which was particularly striking for PAR-1 and PAR-2, were observed in the airways of influenza A/PR-8/34 virus-infected mice compared with sham-infected mice. Furthermore, increased PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression was associated with significant changes in in vivo lung function responses. PAR-1 agonist peptide potentiated methacholine-induced increases in airway resistance in anesthetized sham-infected mice ( and in indomethacin-treated, virus-infected mice), but no such potentiation was observed in virus-infected mice. PAR-2 agonist peptide transiently inhibited methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in sham-infected mice, and this effect was prolonged in virus-infected mice. These findings suggest that during viral infection, the upregulation of PARs in the airways is coupled to increased activation of COX and enhanced generation of bronchodilatory prostanoids.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)L388-L398
JournalAmerican journal of physiology : lung cellular and molecular physiology
Volume286
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Altered expression and in vivo lung function of protease-activated receptors during influenza A virus infection in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this