Alcohol-related presentations to the Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department: A prospective study

Stuart V.B. McLay, Ellen MacDonald, Daniel M. Fatovich, Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments (AHED) Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To quantify and describe alcohol-related presentations to our ED, as part of the binational Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments study. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital of every patient attending ED for the 168-h period commencing 08.00 hours Monday 1 December 2014. Patient presentations were classified as alcohol-related (alcohol-positive) using predefined criteria. These patients were compared to alcohol-negative patients on a range of demographic and clinical descriptors. Results: Two hundred and thirteen (15.2%) of 1403 patients screened were alcohol-positive. Compared with alcohol-negative patients, alcohol-positive patients were more likely to be male (148/213, 69.5% vs 636/1190, 53.4%, P < 0.001) and younger (mean 38 years vs 48 years, P < 0.001). They were more likely to arrive in police custody (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3–9.5, P = 0.005), and be admitted to the State Adult Major Trauma Unit (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.1–8.3, P < 0.001). Forty-two (19.7%) of 213 patients had injuries suspected to be caused by an alcohol-affected third party. The ED length of stay and admission rate were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusions: 15.2% of patient presentations over the study week were alcohol-related. These patients were more likely to present with injury; one in five having injuries suspected to be caused by a third party affected by alcohol. This is a significant public health problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-538
Number of pages8
JournalEMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017

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Hospital Departments
Hospital Emergency Service
Alcohols
Prospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries
Trauma Centers
Police
Observational Studies
Length of Stay
Public Health
Demography

Cite this

McLay, Stuart V.B. ; MacDonald, Ellen ; Fatovich, Daniel M. ; Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments (AHED) Investigators. / Alcohol-related presentations to the Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department : A prospective study. In: EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia. 2017 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 531-538.
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abstract = "Objective: To quantify and describe alcohol-related presentations to our ED, as part of the binational Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments study. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital of every patient attending ED for the 168-h period commencing 08.00 hours Monday 1 December 2014. Patient presentations were classified as alcohol-related (alcohol-positive) using predefined criteria. These patients were compared to alcohol-negative patients on a range of demographic and clinical descriptors. Results: Two hundred and thirteen (15.2{\%}) of 1403 patients screened were alcohol-positive. Compared with alcohol-negative patients, alcohol-positive patients were more likely to be male (148/213, 69.5{\%} vs 636/1190, 53.4{\%}, P < 0.001) and younger (mean 38 years vs 48 years, P < 0.001). They were more likely to arrive in police custody (OR 3.7, 95{\%} CI 1.3–9.5, P = 0.005), and be admitted to the State Adult Major Trauma Unit (OR 4.2, 95{\%} CI 2.1–8.3, P < 0.001). Forty-two (19.7{\%}) of 213 patients had injuries suspected to be caused by an alcohol-affected third party. The ED length of stay and admission rate were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusions: 15.2{\%} of patient presentations over the study week were alcohol-related. These patients were more likely to present with injury; one in five having injuries suspected to be caused by a third party affected by alcohol. This is a significant public health problem.",
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McLay, SVB, MacDonald, E, Fatovich, DM & Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments (AHED) Investigators 2017, 'Alcohol-related presentations to the Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department: A prospective study' EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 531-538. https://doi.org/10.1111/1742-6723.12837

Alcohol-related presentations to the Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department : A prospective study. / McLay, Stuart V.B.; MacDonald, Ellen; Fatovich, Daniel M.; Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments (AHED) Investigators.

In: EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.10.2017, p. 531-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alcohol-related presentations to the Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department

T2 - A prospective study

AU - McLay, Stuart V.B.

AU - MacDonald, Ellen

AU - Fatovich, Daniel M.

AU - Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments (AHED) Investigators

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Objective: To quantify and describe alcohol-related presentations to our ED, as part of the binational Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments study. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital of every patient attending ED for the 168-h period commencing 08.00 hours Monday 1 December 2014. Patient presentations were classified as alcohol-related (alcohol-positive) using predefined criteria. These patients were compared to alcohol-negative patients on a range of demographic and clinical descriptors. Results: Two hundred and thirteen (15.2%) of 1403 patients screened were alcohol-positive. Compared with alcohol-negative patients, alcohol-positive patients were more likely to be male (148/213, 69.5% vs 636/1190, 53.4%, P < 0.001) and younger (mean 38 years vs 48 years, P < 0.001). They were more likely to arrive in police custody (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3–9.5, P = 0.005), and be admitted to the State Adult Major Trauma Unit (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.1–8.3, P < 0.001). Forty-two (19.7%) of 213 patients had injuries suspected to be caused by an alcohol-affected third party. The ED length of stay and admission rate were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusions: 15.2% of patient presentations over the study week were alcohol-related. These patients were more likely to present with injury; one in five having injuries suspected to be caused by a third party affected by alcohol. This is a significant public health problem.

AB - Objective: To quantify and describe alcohol-related presentations to our ED, as part of the binational Alcohol Harm in Emergency Departments study. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital of every patient attending ED for the 168-h period commencing 08.00 hours Monday 1 December 2014. Patient presentations were classified as alcohol-related (alcohol-positive) using predefined criteria. These patients were compared to alcohol-negative patients on a range of demographic and clinical descriptors. Results: Two hundred and thirteen (15.2%) of 1403 patients screened were alcohol-positive. Compared with alcohol-negative patients, alcohol-positive patients were more likely to be male (148/213, 69.5% vs 636/1190, 53.4%, P < 0.001) and younger (mean 38 years vs 48 years, P < 0.001). They were more likely to arrive in police custody (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3–9.5, P = 0.005), and be admitted to the State Adult Major Trauma Unit (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.1–8.3, P < 0.001). Forty-two (19.7%) of 213 patients had injuries suspected to be caused by an alcohol-affected third party. The ED length of stay and admission rate were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusions: 15.2% of patient presentations over the study week were alcohol-related. These patients were more likely to present with injury; one in five having injuries suspected to be caused by a third party affected by alcohol. This is a significant public health problem.

KW - alcohol drinking

KW - emergency service

KW - hospital

KW - wounds and injuries

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U2 - 10.1111/1742-6723.12837

DO - 10.1111/1742-6723.12837

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 531

EP - 538

JO - Emergency Medicine

JF - Emergency Medicine

SN - 1742-6723

IS - 5

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