Age-specific Gender Differences in Long-term Recurrence and Mortality following Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-based Study

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Abstract

Background: Higher mortality following myocardial infarction (MI) is reported in women compared with men with short-term follow-up. Our study aim was to compare long-term gender- and age-specific outcomes following incident MI.

Methods: 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 were identified from linked administrative data in Western Australia. Outcomes identified were recurrent MI, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Follow-up data was available until 30th June 2011. Unadjusted risk out to eight-years was estimated from Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risk in women compared with men by age group.

Results: There were 12,420 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 (males 71.2%). Women had higher levels of comorbidities across all age groups compared with men. Unadjusted event risks were higher in women than men overall, underpinned by higher risk of recurrent MI in 55-69 year-old women and of cardiovascular mortality across all age groups in women. Gender differences were generally attenuated after adjustment for demographic factors and comorbidities.

Conclusions: This study highlights the elevated risk of cardiovascular events in women compared with men with long-term follow-up, and demonstrates the need for improved long-term secondary prevention in this patient group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-449
JournalHeart, Lung and Circulation
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

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Myocardial Infarction
Recurrence
Mortality
Population
Age Groups
Survivors
Comorbidity
Western Australia
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Secondary Prevention
Proportional Hazards Models
Demography

Cite this

@article{11e80ea8da794747a7d410ed334f8602,
title = "Age-specific Gender Differences in Long-term Recurrence and Mortality following Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-based Study",
abstract = "Background: Higher mortality following myocardial infarction (MI) is reported in women compared with men with short-term follow-up. Our study aim was to compare long-term gender- and age-specific outcomes following incident MI. Methods: 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 were identified from linked administrative data in Western Australia. Outcomes identified were recurrent MI, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Follow-up data was available until 30th June 2011. Unadjusted risk out to eight-years was estimated from Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risk in women compared with men by age group. Results: There were 12,420 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 (males 71.2{\%}). Women had higher levels of comorbidities across all age groups compared with men. Unadjusted event risks were higher in women than men overall, underpinned by higher risk of recurrent MI in 55-69 year-old women and of cardiovascular mortality across all age groups in women. Gender differences were generally attenuated after adjustment for demographic factors and comorbidities. Conclusions: This study highlights the elevated risk of cardiovascular events in women compared with men with long-term follow-up, and demonstrates the need for improved long-term secondary prevention in this patient group.",
author = "Lee Nedkoff and Emily Atkins and Matthew Knuiman and Frank Sanfilippo and J. Rankin and Joe Hung",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.hlc.2014.11.022",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "442--449",
journal = "Heart, Lung & Circulation",
issn = "1444-2892",
publisher = "Academic Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age-specific Gender Differences in Long-term Recurrence and Mortality following Incident Myocardial Infarction: A Population-based Study

AU - Nedkoff, Lee

AU - Atkins, Emily

AU - Knuiman, Matthew

AU - Sanfilippo, Frank

AU - Rankin, J.

AU - Hung, Joe

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - Background: Higher mortality following myocardial infarction (MI) is reported in women compared with men with short-term follow-up. Our study aim was to compare long-term gender- and age-specific outcomes following incident MI. Methods: 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 were identified from linked administrative data in Western Australia. Outcomes identified were recurrent MI, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Follow-up data was available until 30th June 2011. Unadjusted risk out to eight-years was estimated from Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risk in women compared with men by age group. Results: There were 12,420 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 (males 71.2%). Women had higher levels of comorbidities across all age groups compared with men. Unadjusted event risks were higher in women than men overall, underpinned by higher risk of recurrent MI in 55-69 year-old women and of cardiovascular mortality across all age groups in women. Gender differences were generally attenuated after adjustment for demographic factors and comorbidities. Conclusions: This study highlights the elevated risk of cardiovascular events in women compared with men with long-term follow-up, and demonstrates the need for improved long-term secondary prevention in this patient group.

AB - Background: Higher mortality following myocardial infarction (MI) is reported in women compared with men with short-term follow-up. Our study aim was to compare long-term gender- and age-specific outcomes following incident MI. Methods: 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 were identified from linked administrative data in Western Australia. Outcomes identified were recurrent MI, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Follow-up data was available until 30th June 2011. Unadjusted risk out to eight-years was estimated from Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risk in women compared with men by age group. Results: There were 12,420 30-day survivors of incident MI from 2003-2009 (males 71.2%). Women had higher levels of comorbidities across all age groups compared with men. Unadjusted event risks were higher in women than men overall, underpinned by higher risk of recurrent MI in 55-69 year-old women and of cardiovascular mortality across all age groups in women. Gender differences were generally attenuated after adjustment for demographic factors and comorbidities. Conclusions: This study highlights the elevated risk of cardiovascular events in women compared with men with long-term follow-up, and demonstrates the need for improved long-term secondary prevention in this patient group.

U2 - 10.1016/j.hlc.2014.11.022

DO - 10.1016/j.hlc.2014.11.022

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 442

EP - 449

JO - Heart, Lung & Circulation

JF - Heart, Lung & Circulation

SN - 1444-2892

IS - 5

ER -