Age and paleomagnetism of the 1210Ma Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia, and implications for late Mesoproterozoic paleogeography

Sergei Pisarevsky, Michael Wingate, Z. Li, X. Wang, Eric Tohver, C.L. Kirkland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Dolerite dykes of the Gnowangerup-Fraser Dyke Suite are subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. We collected oriented samples for paleomagnetic study from 19 dykes along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers and north of Ravensthorpe. Alternating-field (AF) demagnetization revealed a stable two-polarity remanence in 14 dykes, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions is supported by a positive baked-contact test and by rock-magnetic evidence. U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages for two dykes confirm that the Gnowangerup-Fraser dykes are part of the 1210Ma Marnda Moorn Large Igneous Province. The mean paleomagnetic pole, at 55.8°N, 323.9°E, A95=6.5°, is almost identical to the previously reported VGP of the 1212Ma Fraser dyke, also supported by a positive baked-contact test. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210Ma. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time. We present a paleomagnetically permissible drift model for these two continents between 1210 and 1070Ma. One dyke yields a stable remanence with a VGP similar to the paleopole for the 755Ma Mundine Well dykes indicating that this dyke may have been emplaced during the same event at c. 755Ma. Differences in lengths and shapes of late Mesoproterozoic Apparent Polar Wander Paths of several continents suggests that a large supercontinent did not exist between about 1300 and 1050Ma. This may have been a transitional time between the final breakup of Nuna and the assembly of Rodinia. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-15
    JournalPrecambrian Research
    Volume246
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Remanence
    dike swarm
    paleomagnetism
    paleogeography
    dike
    Demagnetization
    craton
    Poles
    Rivers
    Rocks
    baddeleyite
    apparent polar wander path
    large igneous province
    Rodinia
    Laurentia
    supercontinent
    demagnetization
    diabase
    zircon
    river

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    title = "Age and paleomagnetism of the 1210Ma Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia, and implications for late Mesoproterozoic paleogeography",
    abstract = "Dolerite dykes of the Gnowangerup-Fraser Dyke Suite are subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. We collected oriented samples for paleomagnetic study from 19 dykes along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers and north of Ravensthorpe. Alternating-field (AF) demagnetization revealed a stable two-polarity remanence in 14 dykes, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions is supported by a positive baked-contact test and by rock-magnetic evidence. U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages for two dykes confirm that the Gnowangerup-Fraser dykes are part of the 1210Ma Marnda Moorn Large Igneous Province. The mean paleomagnetic pole, at 55.8°N, 323.9°E, A95=6.5°, is almost identical to the previously reported VGP of the 1212Ma Fraser dyke, also supported by a positive baked-contact test. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210Ma. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time. We present a paleomagnetically permissible drift model for these two continents between 1210 and 1070Ma. One dyke yields a stable remanence with a VGP similar to the paleopole for the 755Ma Mundine Well dykes indicating that this dyke may have been emplaced during the same event at c. 755Ma. Differences in lengths and shapes of late Mesoproterozoic Apparent Polar Wander Paths of several continents suggests that a large supercontinent did not exist between about 1300 and 1050Ma. This may have been a transitional time between the final breakup of Nuna and the assembly of Rodinia. {\circledC} 2014 Elsevier B.V.",
    author = "Sergei Pisarevsky and Michael Wingate and Z. Li and X. Wang and Eric Tohver and C.L. Kirkland",
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    Age and paleomagnetism of the 1210Ma Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia, and implications for late Mesoproterozoic paleogeography. / Pisarevsky, Sergei; Wingate, Michael; Li, Z.; Wang, X.; Tohver, Eric; Kirkland, C.L.

    In: Precambrian Research, Vol. 246, 2014, p. 1-15.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Age and paleomagnetism of the 1210Ma Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia, and implications for late Mesoproterozoic paleogeography

    AU - Pisarevsky, Sergei

    AU - Wingate, Michael

    AU - Li, Z.

    AU - Wang, X.

    AU - Tohver, Eric

    AU - Kirkland, C.L.

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Dolerite dykes of the Gnowangerup-Fraser Dyke Suite are subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. We collected oriented samples for paleomagnetic study from 19 dykes along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers and north of Ravensthorpe. Alternating-field (AF) demagnetization revealed a stable two-polarity remanence in 14 dykes, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions is supported by a positive baked-contact test and by rock-magnetic evidence. U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages for two dykes confirm that the Gnowangerup-Fraser dykes are part of the 1210Ma Marnda Moorn Large Igneous Province. The mean paleomagnetic pole, at 55.8°N, 323.9°E, A95=6.5°, is almost identical to the previously reported VGP of the 1212Ma Fraser dyke, also supported by a positive baked-contact test. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210Ma. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time. We present a paleomagnetically permissible drift model for these two continents between 1210 and 1070Ma. One dyke yields a stable remanence with a VGP similar to the paleopole for the 755Ma Mundine Well dykes indicating that this dyke may have been emplaced during the same event at c. 755Ma. Differences in lengths and shapes of late Mesoproterozoic Apparent Polar Wander Paths of several continents suggests that a large supercontinent did not exist between about 1300 and 1050Ma. This may have been a transitional time between the final breakup of Nuna and the assembly of Rodinia. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

    AB - Dolerite dykes of the Gnowangerup-Fraser Dyke Suite are subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. We collected oriented samples for paleomagnetic study from 19 dykes along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers and north of Ravensthorpe. Alternating-field (AF) demagnetization revealed a stable two-polarity remanence in 14 dykes, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions is supported by a positive baked-contact test and by rock-magnetic evidence. U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages for two dykes confirm that the Gnowangerup-Fraser dykes are part of the 1210Ma Marnda Moorn Large Igneous Province. The mean paleomagnetic pole, at 55.8°N, 323.9°E, A95=6.5°, is almost identical to the previously reported VGP of the 1212Ma Fraser dyke, also supported by a positive baked-contact test. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210Ma. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time. We present a paleomagnetically permissible drift model for these two continents between 1210 and 1070Ma. One dyke yields a stable remanence with a VGP similar to the paleopole for the 755Ma Mundine Well dykes indicating that this dyke may have been emplaced during the same event at c. 755Ma. Differences in lengths and shapes of late Mesoproterozoic Apparent Polar Wander Paths of several continents suggests that a large supercontinent did not exist between about 1300 and 1050Ma. This may have been a transitional time between the final breakup of Nuna and the assembly of Rodinia. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

    U2 - 10.1016/j.precamres.2014.02.011

    DO - 10.1016/j.precamres.2014.02.011

    M3 - Article

    VL - 246

    SP - 1

    EP - 15

    JO - Precambrian Research

    JF - Precambrian Research

    SN - 0301-9268

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