Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) as a potential vector of endemic and exotic arboviruses in Australia

Jay Nicholson, S.A. Ritchie, A.F. Van Den Hurk

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    Abstract

    In 2005, established populations of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) were discovered in the Torres Strait, the region that separates Papua New Guinea from northern Australia. This increased the potential for this species to be introduced to mainland Australia. Because it is an arbovirus vector elsewhere, we undertook laboratory-based infection and transmission experiments to determine the potential for Ae. albopictus from the Torres Strait to become infected with and transmit the four major Australian endemic arboviruses-Murray Valley encephalitis virus, West Nile virus Kunjin strain (WNVKUN), Ross River virus (RRV), and Barmah Forest virus-as well as the exotic Japanese encephalitis virus. Ae. albopictus is susceptible to infection with all viruses, with infection rates ranging between 8% for WNVKUN and 71% for RRV. Transmission rates of ≈25% were observed for RRV and Barmah Forest virus, but these were
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)661-669
    JournalJournal of Medical Entomology
    Volume51
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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