Advance care planning in palliative care: A national survey of health professionals and service managers

M. Sellars, W. Silvester, M. Masso, Claire Johnson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © AHHA 2015. Objective. To identify the attitudes, knowledge and practices regarding advance care planning (ACP) in palliative care. Methods. A nationwide online survey was distributed to Australian palliative care services associated with the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (n≤105). Seventy-three health professionals (HPs) and 59 service managers completed the survey. Results. Regarding ACP, 51% of service managers reported relevant policies and procedures were in place in their service and 44% included ACP in job descriptions. Most HPs were confident in undertaking ACP, including initiating discussions with patients and complying with documents; however, only 44% reported receiving ACP specific training. Although 58% of HPs reported having conversations about ACP with more than 11 patients in the past 6 months, only 44% of managers report that it is offered to most patients. Thirty per cent of HPs were aware of others not adhering to patient wishes in the past 6 months and only 43% of HPs (and 37% of managers) believed ACP is done well within their service. Conclusions. This first national survey examining ACP in palliative care services demonstrates there is a need to improve systems to support ACP and to understand circumstances in which ACP wishes are not followed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)146-153
    JournalAustralian Health Review
    Volume39
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Advance Care Planning
    Palliative Care
    Health Services
    Health
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Job Description
    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice

    Cite this

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    title = "Advance care planning in palliative care: A national survey of health professionals and service managers",
    abstract = "{\circledC} AHHA 2015. Objective. To identify the attitudes, knowledge and practices regarding advance care planning (ACP) in palliative care. Methods. A nationwide online survey was distributed to Australian palliative care services associated with the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (n≤105). Seventy-three health professionals (HPs) and 59 service managers completed the survey. Results. Regarding ACP, 51{\%} of service managers reported relevant policies and procedures were in place in their service and 44{\%} included ACP in job descriptions. Most HPs were confident in undertaking ACP, including initiating discussions with patients and complying with documents; however, only 44{\%} reported receiving ACP specific training. Although 58{\%} of HPs reported having conversations about ACP with more than 11 patients in the past 6 months, only 44{\%} of managers report that it is offered to most patients. Thirty per cent of HPs were aware of others not adhering to patient wishes in the past 6 months and only 43{\%} of HPs (and 37{\%} of managers) believed ACP is done well within their service. Conclusions. This first national survey examining ACP in palliative care services demonstrates there is a need to improve systems to support ACP and to understand circumstances in which ACP wishes are not followed.",
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    Advance care planning in palliative care: A national survey of health professionals and service managers. / Sellars, M.; Silvester, W.; Masso, M.; Johnson, Claire.

    In: Australian Health Review, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2015, p. 146-153.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

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    AU - Sellars, M.

    AU - Silvester, W.

    AU - Masso, M.

    AU - Johnson, Claire

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - © AHHA 2015. Objective. To identify the attitudes, knowledge and practices regarding advance care planning (ACP) in palliative care. Methods. A nationwide online survey was distributed to Australian palliative care services associated with the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (n≤105). Seventy-three health professionals (HPs) and 59 service managers completed the survey. Results. Regarding ACP, 51% of service managers reported relevant policies and procedures were in place in their service and 44% included ACP in job descriptions. Most HPs were confident in undertaking ACP, including initiating discussions with patients and complying with documents; however, only 44% reported receiving ACP specific training. Although 58% of HPs reported having conversations about ACP with more than 11 patients in the past 6 months, only 44% of managers report that it is offered to most patients. Thirty per cent of HPs were aware of others not adhering to patient wishes in the past 6 months and only 43% of HPs (and 37% of managers) believed ACP is done well within their service. Conclusions. This first national survey examining ACP in palliative care services demonstrates there is a need to improve systems to support ACP and to understand circumstances in which ACP wishes are not followed.

    AB - © AHHA 2015. Objective. To identify the attitudes, knowledge and practices regarding advance care planning (ACP) in palliative care. Methods. A nationwide online survey was distributed to Australian palliative care services associated with the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (n≤105). Seventy-three health professionals (HPs) and 59 service managers completed the survey. Results. Regarding ACP, 51% of service managers reported relevant policies and procedures were in place in their service and 44% included ACP in job descriptions. Most HPs were confident in undertaking ACP, including initiating discussions with patients and complying with documents; however, only 44% reported receiving ACP specific training. Although 58% of HPs reported having conversations about ACP with more than 11 patients in the past 6 months, only 44% of managers report that it is offered to most patients. Thirty per cent of HPs were aware of others not adhering to patient wishes in the past 6 months and only 43% of HPs (and 37% of managers) believed ACP is done well within their service. Conclusions. This first national survey examining ACP in palliative care services demonstrates there is a need to improve systems to support ACP and to understand circumstances in which ACP wishes are not followed.

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