Addition of alarm pheromone to insecticides and the possible improvement of the control of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera:Thripidae)

D.F. Cook, Ian Dadour, W.J. Bailey, Win Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This study represents the first attempt to improve insecticide contact using the dodecyl acetate component of the alarm pheromone of the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande). Dodecyl acetate dissolved in ethanol was added to both fipronil and maldison and used in three spray applications (7 days apart) against field infestations of F. occidentalis on strawberries in two separate trials. Fipronil alone was highly effective against larvae and to a lesser extent against adults; however, the addition of dodecyl acetate did not significantly enhance thrips mortality. Although maldison was significantly less effective against adults and larvae, the larval mortality rate was significantly increased with the addition of dodecyl acetate. In one trial, dodecyl acetate applied on its own caused a significant reduction in larval numbers. Frequent insecticide applications are recommended for control of F. occidentalis in Australia because of the short-term effectiveness of most insecticides. This may hasten the development of insecticide resistance, which is already evident in F. occidentalis populations across the continent. Hence, either cultural methods, biological control agents or more effective chemicals need to be identified. This study has shown that there is potential for dodecyl acetate to enhance insecticide control of F occidentalis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-290
JournalInternational Journal of Pest Management
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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