Adaptive plant plasticity to light and disease: Perspective from natural variation in Camelina sativa

Maria Purnamasari

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

465 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Phenotypic plasticity, a single genotype's capacity to adapt to multiple environments, is a fundamental factor in crop production. Yet, consideration of this plasticity has been limited. This thesis focuses on adaptive plasticity in Camelina sativa in response to simulated shade and disease. A comparative approach including two well-studied species, Arabidopsis thaliana and canola (Brassica napus) to study Camelina, a species with relatively low genetic diversity. The findings not only contribute to crop improvement and disease management in Camelina, but to plant genetics of plant defence under shade, common in many plant diseases.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Croser, Janine, Supervisor
  • Erskine, William, Supervisor
  • Lichtenzveig, Judith, Supervisor
  • Barbetti, Martin, Supervisor
Award date14 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

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