Adapting the Bridges stroke self-management programme for use in Australia

Barbara Singer, Fiona Jones, Sheila Lennon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Aims: This study explored the applicability of the UK Bridges stroke self-management programme for use in an Australian health care context, and specifcally, the need for any modifcation to the workbook tool. Methods: Data were collected via survey from Australian stroke professionals who had attended a 2-day Bridges training workshop and from focus groups with community-based stroke survivors across three different states. Findings: A total of 18 out of 30 workshop attendees (60%) completed the electronic survey. Most (94%) agreed that the training had advanced their practice with a stronger focus on self-management principles and that they would recommend the training to colleagues. The majority (71%) had incorporated some Bridges stroke self-management programme principles or strategies into their practice; although 81% reported a range of barriers to doing so. A total of 26 stroke survivors attended focus groups. The workbook was considered to be a useful tool to support self-management. Suggestions for change included the addition of some culturally contextualised patient stories and locally relevant stroke support resources. Conclusions: Stroke survivors and health professionals recognised the need for structured training, such as the Bridges stroke self-management programme, to develop self-management skills and knowledge post stroke. The Bridges stroke self-management programme workbook would be able to be used in Australia with minor modifcation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-423
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2018

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Self Care
Stroke
Survivors
Focus Groups
Education
Delivery of Health Care
Health

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Singer, Barbara ; Jones, Fiona ; Lennon, Sheila. / Adapting the Bridges stroke self-management programme for use in Australia. In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 414-423.
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Adapting the Bridges stroke self-management programme for use in Australia. / Singer, Barbara; Jones, Fiona; Lennon, Sheila.

In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, Vol. 25, No. 8, 02.08.2018, p. 414-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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