Active isolation of a vibration source from a thin beam using a single active mount

J.Q. Pan, C.H. Hansen, Jie Pan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    When active control is used to reduce the vibration transmission through machine mounts into supporting structures, the vibratory power flow through the mounts is often used as the cost function to be minimized. This is because the mounts behave as vibration ''sources'' for the supporting structure and they have a finite number of degrees of freedom. To apply active control effectively to suspension systems, it is necessary to investigate the nature of the power flow from a vibrating machine to its supporting structure through the mounts. In this study the transmission of harmonic vibratory power flow from a vibrating rigid body into a thin support beam through a single isolating mount is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the possibility of active control of the transmission of vibratory power is explored. Power flow resulting from moments as well as horizontal and vertical forces is considered. It is shown that over a wide frequency range, significant reduction in vibratory power flow can be achieved by using a control actuator that exerts a control force on the rigid body and support structure
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1425-1434
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume94
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1993

    Fingerprint

    isolation
    vibration
    active control
    rigid structures
    beams (supports)
    Isolation
    degrees of freedom
    actuators
    frequency ranges
    costs
    moments
    harmonics

    Cite this

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    abstract = "When active control is used to reduce the vibration transmission through machine mounts into supporting structures, the vibratory power flow through the mounts is often used as the cost function to be minimized. This is because the mounts behave as vibration ''sources'' for the supporting structure and they have a finite number of degrees of freedom. To apply active control effectively to suspension systems, it is necessary to investigate the nature of the power flow from a vibrating machine to its supporting structure through the mounts. In this study the transmission of harmonic vibratory power flow from a vibrating rigid body into a thin support beam through a single isolating mount is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the possibility of active control of the transmission of vibratory power is explored. Power flow resulting from moments as well as horizontal and vertical forces is considered. It is shown that over a wide frequency range, significant reduction in vibratory power flow can be achieved by using a control actuator that exerts a control force on the rigid body and support structure",
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    Active isolation of a vibration source from a thin beam using a single active mount. / Pan, J.Q.; Hansen, C.H.; Pan, Jie.

    In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 94, 1993, p. 1425-1434.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Pan, J.Q.

    AU - Hansen, C.H.

    AU - Pan, Jie

    PY - 1993

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    AB - When active control is used to reduce the vibration transmission through machine mounts into supporting structures, the vibratory power flow through the mounts is often used as the cost function to be minimized. This is because the mounts behave as vibration ''sources'' for the supporting structure and they have a finite number of degrees of freedom. To apply active control effectively to suspension systems, it is necessary to investigate the nature of the power flow from a vibrating machine to its supporting structure through the mounts. In this study the transmission of harmonic vibratory power flow from a vibrating rigid body into a thin support beam through a single isolating mount is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the possibility of active control of the transmission of vibratory power is explored. Power flow resulting from moments as well as horizontal and vertical forces is considered. It is shown that over a wide frequency range, significant reduction in vibratory power flow can be achieved by using a control actuator that exerts a control force on the rigid body and support structure

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