Acoustic Insertion Loss of Balconies and Building Facades: trapped modes and computation methods

James Leader

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

For noise intrusion problems, such as road traffic noise into apartment buildings, the ability to quantify the insertion loss of balconies and building facades is an important consideration. This thesis develops analytical models to calculate the insertion loss, which are compared to the direct solution of the wave equation using the boundary element method. In this manner, it is possible to mathematically explain phenomena such as negative insertion loss in the context of the trapped modes of the open cavity system, and frequency dependent values can be efficiently calculated for various geometric configurations and soffit treatments.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Thesis sponsors
Award date5 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2019

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insertion loss
acoustics
theses
boundary element method
roads
intrusion
traffic
wave equations
cavities
configurations

Cite this

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title = "Acoustic Insertion Loss of Balconies and Building Facades: trapped modes and computation methods",
abstract = "For noise intrusion problems, such as road traffic noise into apartment buildings, the ability to quantify the insertion loss of balconies and building facades is an important consideration. This thesis develops analytical models to calculate the insertion loss, which are compared to the direct solution of the wave equation using the boundary element method. In this manner, it is possible to mathematically explain phenomena such as negative insertion loss in the context of the trapped modes of the open cavity system, and frequency dependent values can be efficiently calculated for various geometric configurations and soffit treatments.",
keywords = "insertion loss, boundary element, balconies, finite difference, trapped modes, building facade, quasinormal modes, acoustic",
author = "James Leader",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.26182/5ce7797cf1ac6",
language = "English",
school = "The University of Western Australia",

}

Acoustic Insertion Loss of Balconies and Building Facades: trapped modes and computation methods. / Leader, James.

2019.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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AU - Leader, James

PY - 2019

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N2 - For noise intrusion problems, such as road traffic noise into apartment buildings, the ability to quantify the insertion loss of balconies and building facades is an important consideration. This thesis develops analytical models to calculate the insertion loss, which are compared to the direct solution of the wave equation using the boundary element method. In this manner, it is possible to mathematically explain phenomena such as negative insertion loss in the context of the trapped modes of the open cavity system, and frequency dependent values can be efficiently calculated for various geometric configurations and soffit treatments.

AB - For noise intrusion problems, such as road traffic noise into apartment buildings, the ability to quantify the insertion loss of balconies and building facades is an important consideration. This thesis develops analytical models to calculate the insertion loss, which are compared to the direct solution of the wave equation using the boundary element method. In this manner, it is possible to mathematically explain phenomena such as negative insertion loss in the context of the trapped modes of the open cavity system, and frequency dependent values can be efficiently calculated for various geometric configurations and soffit treatments.

KW - insertion loss

KW - boundary element

KW - balconies

KW - finite difference

KW - trapped modes

KW - building facade

KW - quasinormal modes

KW - acoustic

U2 - 10.26182/5ce7797cf1ac6

DO - 10.26182/5ce7797cf1ac6

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -