Accuracy of partial weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation

Jay Ebert, Tim Ackland, David Lloyd, D.J. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)
151 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective:To determine whether patients can accurately replicate and retain weight-bearing restrictions in both stationary (static) and dynamic conditions after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).Design:Case series.Setting:Rehabilitation clinic.Participants:A consecutive sample of patients (N=48) who had undergone ACI to a medial or lateral femoral condylar defect in the knee.Interventions:Patients were trained to partially weight bear using bathroom scales and forearm crutches prior to assessment.Main Outcome Measures:A force platform was used to measure peak vertical ground reaction forces in patients during static and dynamic conditions immediately after weight-bearing instruction and training, and again during gait 7 days after training.Results:Immediately after instruction and weight-bearing practice on a set of scales, patients exerted a mean of 15.8% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials, 8.3% more for the 40% trials, 11.9% more for the 60% trials, and 1.2% less for the prescribed 80% trials. Accuracy of weight-bearing replication improved across all weight-bearing levels when assessed 7 days later, when patients exerted a mean of 6.6% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials (9.2% body weight improvement), 4.2% more for the 40% trials (4.1% body weight improvement), 9.9% more for the 60% trials (2% body weight improvement), and 0.2% more for the 60% trials (1% body weight improvement).Conclusions:Patients were unable to follow weight-bearing restrictions after instruction and practice on a set of scales, and patients were unable to replicate weight-bearing levels in both static and dynamic conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1528-1534
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume89
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Weight-Bearing
Chondrocytes
Body Weight
Walking
Toilet Facilities
Crutches
Thigh
Gait
Forearm
Knee
Rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures

Cite this

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title = "Accuracy of partial weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation",
abstract = "Objective:To determine whether patients can accurately replicate and retain weight-bearing restrictions in both stationary (static) and dynamic conditions after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).Design:Case series.Setting:Rehabilitation clinic.Participants:A consecutive sample of patients (N=48) who had undergone ACI to a medial or lateral femoral condylar defect in the knee.Interventions:Patients were trained to partially weight bear using bathroom scales and forearm crutches prior to assessment.Main Outcome Measures:A force platform was used to measure peak vertical ground reaction forces in patients during static and dynamic conditions immediately after weight-bearing instruction and training, and again during gait 7 days after training.Results:Immediately after instruction and weight-bearing practice on a set of scales, patients exerted a mean of 15.8{\%} body weight more than expected during walking for 20{\%} weight-bearing trials, 8.3{\%} more for the 40{\%} trials, 11.9{\%} more for the 60{\%} trials, and 1.2{\%} less for the prescribed 80{\%} trials. Accuracy of weight-bearing replication improved across all weight-bearing levels when assessed 7 days later, when patients exerted a mean of 6.6{\%} body weight more than expected during walking for 20{\%} weight-bearing trials (9.2{\%} body weight improvement), 4.2{\%} more for the 40{\%} trials (4.1{\%} body weight improvement), 9.9{\%} more for the 60{\%} trials (2{\%} body weight improvement), and 0.2{\%} more for the 60{\%} trials (1{\%} body weight improvement).Conclusions:Patients were unable to follow weight-bearing restrictions after instruction and practice on a set of scales, and patients were unable to replicate weight-bearing levels in both static and dynamic conditions.",
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Accuracy of partial weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation. / Ebert, Jay; Ackland, Tim; Lloyd, David; Wood, D.J.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 89, No. 8, 2008, p. 1528-1534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accuracy of partial weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation

AU - Ebert, Jay

AU - Ackland, Tim

AU - Lloyd, David

AU - Wood, D.J.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Objective:To determine whether patients can accurately replicate and retain weight-bearing restrictions in both stationary (static) and dynamic conditions after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).Design:Case series.Setting:Rehabilitation clinic.Participants:A consecutive sample of patients (N=48) who had undergone ACI to a medial or lateral femoral condylar defect in the knee.Interventions:Patients were trained to partially weight bear using bathroom scales and forearm crutches prior to assessment.Main Outcome Measures:A force platform was used to measure peak vertical ground reaction forces in patients during static and dynamic conditions immediately after weight-bearing instruction and training, and again during gait 7 days after training.Results:Immediately after instruction and weight-bearing practice on a set of scales, patients exerted a mean of 15.8% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials, 8.3% more for the 40% trials, 11.9% more for the 60% trials, and 1.2% less for the prescribed 80% trials. Accuracy of weight-bearing replication improved across all weight-bearing levels when assessed 7 days later, when patients exerted a mean of 6.6% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials (9.2% body weight improvement), 4.2% more for the 40% trials (4.1% body weight improvement), 9.9% more for the 60% trials (2% body weight improvement), and 0.2% more for the 60% trials (1% body weight improvement).Conclusions:Patients were unable to follow weight-bearing restrictions after instruction and practice on a set of scales, and patients were unable to replicate weight-bearing levels in both static and dynamic conditions.

AB - Objective:To determine whether patients can accurately replicate and retain weight-bearing restrictions in both stationary (static) and dynamic conditions after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).Design:Case series.Setting:Rehabilitation clinic.Participants:A consecutive sample of patients (N=48) who had undergone ACI to a medial or lateral femoral condylar defect in the knee.Interventions:Patients were trained to partially weight bear using bathroom scales and forearm crutches prior to assessment.Main Outcome Measures:A force platform was used to measure peak vertical ground reaction forces in patients during static and dynamic conditions immediately after weight-bearing instruction and training, and again during gait 7 days after training.Results:Immediately after instruction and weight-bearing practice on a set of scales, patients exerted a mean of 15.8% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials, 8.3% more for the 40% trials, 11.9% more for the 60% trials, and 1.2% less for the prescribed 80% trials. Accuracy of weight-bearing replication improved across all weight-bearing levels when assessed 7 days later, when patients exerted a mean of 6.6% body weight more than expected during walking for 20% weight-bearing trials (9.2% body weight improvement), 4.2% more for the 40% trials (4.1% body weight improvement), 9.9% more for the 60% trials (2% body weight improvement), and 0.2% more for the 60% trials (1% body weight improvement).Conclusions:Patients were unable to follow weight-bearing restrictions after instruction and practice on a set of scales, and patients were unable to replicate weight-bearing levels in both static and dynamic conditions.

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DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.02.019

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JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 8

ER -